the large and varied plant family Compositae (or Asteraceae), typified by herbaceous plants having alternate, opposite, or whorled leaves and a whorl of bracts surrounding the flower heads, which are usually composed of a disk containing tiny petalless flowers and a ray of petals extending from the flowers at the rim of the disk, some flower heads being composed only of a disk or a ray and some plants having clusters of flower heads, and including the aster, daisy, dandelion, goldenrod, marigold, ragweed, sunflower, thistle, and zinnia.
composite family
A very large family of flowering plants, Asteraceae (or Compositae), comprising about 1,100 genera and more than 20,000 species, including the daisy, lettuce, and marigold. The composite plants are eudicots and are considered to be the most highly evolved plants. Their inflorescences are characterized by many small flowers arranged in a head that resembles a single flower and arises from an involucre of bracts. A head may consist of both ray flowers and disk flowers, as in the sunflower, of disk flowers only, as in the burdock, or of ray flowers only, as in the dandelion.


Read Also:

  • Composite flap

    composite flap com·pos·ite flap (kəm-pŏz’ĭt) n. A skin flap incorporating underlying muscle, bone, or cartilage. Also called compound flap.

  • Composite-function

    noun, Mathematics. 1. a function obtained from two given functions, where the range of one function is contained in the domain of the second function, by assigning to an element in the domain of the first function that element in the range of the second function whose inverse image is the image of the element.

  • Composite graft

    composite graft n. A graft composed of multiple structures, such as skin and cartilage.

  • Composite materials

    composite materials [(kuhm-poz-it)] Materials, generally strong and lightweight, in which fibers of more than one sort of material are bonded together chemically. These types of materials were developed in the laboratory and derive their strength from the combination of materials rather than from the interlocking of a uniform set of atoms.

Disclaimer: Composite-family definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.