[kuh n-sizh-uh n] /kənˈsɪʒ ən/

quality; brevity; terseness.
Archaic. a cutting up or off; mutilation.
the quality of being concise; brevity; terseness

late 14c., “cutting away, mutilation,” also, from 16c., “circumcision,” from Latin concisionem “a separation into divisions,” literally “a cutting up,” noun of action from past participle stem of concidere “to cut up” (see concise). From 18c. it began to be used in the sense of conciseness (q.v.).

(Gr. katatome; i.e., “mutilation”), a term used by Paul contemptuously of those who were zealots for circumcision (Phil. 3:2). Instead of the warning, “Beware of the circumcision” (peritome) i.e., of the party who pressed on Gentile converts the necessity of still observing that ordinance, he says, “Beware of the concision;” as much as to say, “This circumcision which they vaunt of is in Christ only as the gashings and mutilations of idolatrous heathen.”


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