Consolable



[kuh n-sohl] /kənˈsoʊl/

verb (used with object), consoled, consoling.
1.
to alleviate or lessen the grief, sorrow, or disappointment of; give solace or comfort:
Only his children could console him when his wife died.
/kənˈsəʊl/
verb
1.
to serve as a source of comfort to (someone) in disappointment, loss, sadness, etc
/ˈkɒnsəʊl/
noun
1.
an ornamental bracket, esp one used to support a wall fixture, bust, etc
2.
the part of an organ comprising the manuals, pedals, stops, etc
3.
a unit on which the controls of an electronic system are mounted
4.
same as games console
5.
a cabinet for a television, gramophone, etc, designed to stand on the floor
6.
See console table
v.

1690s, from French consoler “to comfort, console,” from Latin consolari “offer solace, encourage, comfort, cheer,” from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + solari “to comfort” (see solace). Or perhaps a back-formation from consolation. The Latin word is glossed in Old English by frefran. Related: Consoled; consoling.
n.

1706, “a cabinet; an ornamental base structure,” from French console “a bracket” (16c.), of uncertain origin, possibly from Middle French consolateur, literally “one who consoles,” word used for carved human figures supporting cornices, shelves or rails in choir stalls. Another guess connects it to Latin consolidare. Sense evolved to “body of a musical organ” (1881), “radio cabinet” (1925), then “cabinet for a TV, stereo, etc.” (1944).

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Consolate

    v. late 15c., from Latin consolatus, past participle of consolari (see console (v.)); obsolete and replaced by console (v.).

  • Consolation

    [kon-suh-ley-shuh n] /ˌkɒn səˈleɪ ʃən/ noun 1. the act of ; comfort; solace. 2. the state of being . 3. someone or something that : His faith was a consolation during his troubles. Her daughters are a consolation to her. 4. Sports. a game, match, or race for tournament entrants eliminated before the final round, […]



  • Consolation of israel

    a name for the Messiah in common use among the Jews, probably suggested by Isa. 12:1; 49:13. The Greek word thus rendered (Luke 2:25, paraklesis) is kindred to that translated “Comforter” in John 14:16, etc., parakletos.

  • Consolation-of-philosophy

    noun 1. Latin De Consolatione Philosophiae. a philosophical work (a.d. 523?) by Boethius.



Disclaimer: Consolable definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.