Constant



[kon-stuh nt] /ˈkɒn stənt/

adjective
1.
not changing or varying; uniform; regular; invariable:
All conditions during the three experiments were constant.
2.
continuing without pause or letup; unceasing:
constant noise.
3.
regularly recurrent; continual; persistent:
He found it impossible to work with constant interruption.
4.
faithful; unswerving in love, devotion, etc.:
a constant lover.
5.
steadfast; firm in mind or purpose; resolute.
6.
Obsolete. certain; confident.
noun
7.
something that does not or cannot change or vary.
8.
Physics. a number expressing a property, quantity, or relation that remains unchanged under specified conditions.
9.
Mathematics. a quantity assumed to be unchanged throughout a given discussion.
[kawn-stahn] /kɔ̃ˈstɑ̃/
noun
1.
Paul Henri Benjamin Balluat
[pawl ahn-ree ban-zha-man ba-lwa] /pɔl ɑ̃ˈri bɛ̃ ʒaˈmɛ̃ baˈlwa/ (Show IPA), .
2.
Jean Joseph Benjamin
[zhahn zhaw-zef ban-zha-man] /ʒɑ̃ ʒɔˈzɛf bɛ̃ ʒaˈmɛ̃/ (Show IPA), 1845–1902, French painter.
/ˈkɒnstənt/
adjective
1.
fixed and invariable; unchanging
2.
continual or continuous; incessant: constant interruptions
3.
resolute in mind, purpose, or affection; loyal
noun
4.
something that is permanent or unchanging
5.
a specific quantity that is always invariable: the velocity of light is a constant
6.

7.
See logical constant
/French kɔ̃stɑ̃/
noun
1.
Benjamin (bɛ̃ʒamɛ̃). real name Henri Benjamin Constant de Rebecque. 1767–1830, French writer and politician: author of the psychological novel Adolphe (1816)
adj.

late 14c., “steadfast, resolute,” from Old French constant (14c.) or directly from Latin constantem (nominative constans) “standing firm, stable, steadfast, faithful,” present participle of constare, from com- “together” (see com-) + stare “to stand,” from PIE root *sta- “to stand” (see stet). Of actions and conditions from 1650s. Related: Constantly.
n.

1832 in mathematics and physics, from constant (adj.).

constant con·stant (kŏn’stənt)
adj.

n.

constant
(kŏn’stənt)

A number that appears in equations and formulas and does not vary or change. Examples are Planck’s constant and the speed of light.

Related Terms

finagle factor

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