Corridor



[kawr-i-der, -dawr, kor-] /ˈkɔr ɪ dər, -ˌdɔr, ˈkɒr-/

noun
1.
a gallery or passage connecting parts of a building; hallway.
2.
a passage into which several rooms or apartments open.
3.
a passageway in a passenger ship or railroad car permitting access to separate cabins or compartments.
4.
a narrow tract of land forming a passageway, as one connecting two major cities or one belonging to an inland country and affording an outlet to the sea:
the Polish Corridor.
5.
a usually densely populated region characterized by one or more well-traveled routes used by railroad, airline, or other carriers:
The Northeast corridor extends from Washington, D.C., to Boston.
6.
Aeronautics. a restricted path along which an aircraft must travel to avoid hostile action, other air traffic, etc.
7.
Aerospace. a carefully calculated path through the atmosphere along which a space vehicle must travel after launch or during reentry in order to attain a desired orbit, to avoid severe acceleration and deceleration, or to minimize aerodynamic heating.
/ˈkɒrɪˌdɔː/
noun
1.
a hallway or passage connecting parts of a building
2.
a strip of land or airspace along the route of a road or river: the M1 corridor
3.
a strip of land or airspace that affords access, either from a landlocked country to the sea (such as the Polish corridor, 1919-39, which divided Germany) or from a state to an exclave (such as the Berlin corridor, 1945–90, which passed through the former East Germany)
4.
a passageway connecting the compartments of a railway coach
5.
corridors of power, the higher echelons of government, the Civil Service, etc, considered as the location of power and influence
6.
a flight path that affords safe access for intruding aircraft
7.
the path that a spacecraft must follow when re-entering the atmosphere, above which lift is insufficient and below which heating effects are excessive
n.

1590s, from French corridor (16c.), from Italian corridore “a gallery,” literally “a runner,” from correre “to run,” from Latin currere (see current (adj.)). Originally of fortifications, meaning “long hallway” is first recorded 1814.

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