Drunk as a lord

Also, drunk as a fiddler or skunk ; falling-down or roaring drunk . Extremely intoxicated, as in He came home drunk as a lord . The three similes have survived numerous others. The first was considered proverbial by the mid-1600s and presumably alludes to the fact that noblemen drank more than commoners (because they could afford to). The fiddler alludes to the practice of plying musicians with alcohol (sometimes instead of pay), whereas skunk , dating from the early 1900s, was undoubtedly chosen for the rhyme. The most graphic variant alludes to someone too drunk to keep his or her balance, as in He couldn’t make it up the stairs; be was falling-down drunk . And roaring drunk , alluding to being extremely noisy as well as intoxicated, was first recorded in 1697. Also see dead drunk


Read Also:

  • Drunkard

    [druhng-kerd] /ˈdrʌŋ kərd/ noun 1. a person who is habitually or frequently . /ˈdrʌŋkəd/ noun 1. a person who is frequently or habitually drunk n. 1520s, droncarde, but probably older (attested from late 13c. as a surname, Druncard), from Middle English dronken, participial adjective from drunk (q.v.), + -ard.

  • Drunk as a skunk

    adjective phrase Very drunk; schnockered: They bring beer and cigarettes, are drunk as skunks (1940s+)

  • Drunkathon

    /ˈdrʌŋkəˌθɒn/ noun 1. (informal) a session in which excessive quantities of alcohol are consumed

  • Drunk-dial

    [druhngk-dahy-uh l, -dahyl] /ˈdrʌŋkˈdaɪ əl, -ˈdaɪl/ Slang. verb (used with or without object) 1. to phone (someone) while intoxicated: How can you avoid drunk dialing? Have you ever drunk-dialed an ex-girlfriend? noun 2. a phone call made by someone who is intoxicated.

Disclaimer: Drunk as a lord definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.