Duke



[dook, dyook] /duk, dyuk/

noun
1.
(in Continental Europe) the male ruler of a duchy; the sovereign of a small state.
2.
a British nobleman holding the highest hereditary title outside the royal family, ranking immediately below a prince and above a marquis; a member of the highest rank of the British peerage.
3.
a nobleman of corresponding rank in certain other countries.
4.
a cultivated hybrid of the sweet and sour cherry.
5.
dukes, Slang. fists; hands:
Put up your dukes.
verb (used with object), duked, duking.
6.
Slang. to hit or thrash with the fists (sometimes followed by out):
He duked me because he said I had insulted him. The bully said he was going to duke out anyone who disagreed.
Idioms
7.
duke it out, to fight, especially with the fists; do battle:
The adversaries were prepared to duke it out in the alley.
[dook, dyook] /duk, dyuk/
noun
1.
Benjamin Newton, 1855–1929, and his brother, James Buchanan, 1856–1925, U.S. industrialists.
2.
a male given name.
[weyn] /weɪn/
noun
1.
Anthony (“Mad Anthony”) 1745–96, American Revolutionary War general.
2.
John (Marion Michael Morrison”Duke”) 1907–79, U.S. film actor.
3.
a township in N New Jersey.
4.
a city in SE Michigan, near Detroit.
5.
a male given name: from an Old English word meaning “wagonmaker.”.
[el-ing-tuh n] /ˈɛl ɪŋ tən/
noun
1.
Edward Kennedy (“Duke”) 1899–1974, U.S. jazz pianist, composer, arranger, and conductor.
/djuːk/
noun
1.
a nobleman of high rank: in the British Isles standing above the other grades of the nobility
2.
the prince or ruler of a small principality or duchy
/weɪn/
noun
1.
John, real name Marion Michael Morrison. 1907–79, US film actor, noted esp for his many Westerns, which include Stagecoach (1939), The Alamo (1960), and True Grit (1969), for which he won an Oscar
/ˈɛlɪŋtən/
noun
1.
Duke, nickname of Edward Kennedy Ellington. 1899–1974, US jazz composer, pianist, and conductor, famous for such works as “Mood Indigo” and “Creole Love Call”
n.

early 12c., “sovereign prince,” from Old French duc (12c.) and directly from Latin dux (genitive ducis) “leader, commander,” in Late Latin “governor of a province,” from ducere “to lead,” from PIE *deuk- “to lead” (cf. Old English togian “to pull, drag,” Old High German ziohan “to pull,” Old English togian “to draw, drag,” Middle Welsh dygaf “I draw”).

Applied in English to “nobleman of the highest rank” probably first mid-14c., ousting native earl. Also used to translate various European titles (e.g. Russian knyaz).

surname, by 1319, variant of Wain, representing wainwright, wainer (see wain) or perhaps “one who dwells by the tavern with the sign of the wain.”

noun

verb

Related Terms

dukes

[perhaps fr Romany dook, ”the hand as read in palmistry, one’s fate”]

derived from the Latin dux, meaning “a leader;” Arabic, “a sheik.” This word is used to denote the phylarch or chief of a tribe (Gen. 36:15-43; Ex. 15:15; 1 Chr. 1:51-54).

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  • Duked

    [dook, dyook] /duk, dyuk/ noun 1. (in Continental Europe) the male ruler of a duchy; the sovereign of a small state. 2. a British nobleman holding the highest hereditary title outside the royal family, ranking immediately below a prince and above a marquis; a member of the highest rank of the British peerage. 3. a […]

  • Dukedom

    [dook-duh m, dyook-] /ˈduk dəm, ˈdyuk-/ noun 1. a duchy. 2. the office or rank of a . /ˈdjuːkdəm/ noun 1. another name for a duchy 2. the title, rank, or position of a duke



  • Duked-up

    adjective, Slang. 1. dressed up; ornamented; embellished: an old car duked up with leather upholstery and wire wheels.

  • Duke-of-gloucester

    [glos-ter, glaw-ster] /ˈglɒs tər, ˈglɔ stər/ noun 1. Duke of, . 2. a seaport in W in SW England, on the Severn River. 3. a seaport in NE Massachusetts. 4. . [huhm-free] /ˈhʌm fri/ noun 1. (Duke of Gloucester) 1391–1447, English soldier and statesman (youngest son of Henry IV). 2. Doris, 1895–1958, U.S. dancer, choreographer, […]



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