Each and every one

Also, every last one ; every single one . Every individual in a group, as in Each and every student must register by tomorrow , or I’ve graded every last one of the exams , or Every single one of his answers was wrong . All of these phrases are generally used for emphasis. The first, although seemingly redundant, has replaced all and every , first recorded in 1502. The first variant dates from the late 1800s, and both it and the second are widely used. Also see every tom, dick, and harry Every mother’s son (late 1500s) and every man Jack (mid-1800s) are earlier versions that refer only to males.


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  • Eacher

    [eech] /itʃ/ adjective 1. every one of two or more considered individually or one by one: each stone in a building; a hallway with a door at each end. pronoun 2. every one individually; each one: Each had a different solution to the problem. adverb 3. to, from, or for each; apiece: They cost a […]

  • Each-other

    pronoun 1. each the other; one another (used as a compound reciprocal pronoun): to strike at each other; to hold each other’s hands; to love each other. pronoun 1. used when the action, attribution, etc, is reciprocal: furious with each other reciprocal pronoun, originally in late Old English a phrase, with each as the subject […]

  • Each way

    adjective, adverb 1. (horse racing, mainly Brit) (of a bet) made on the same runner or contestant to win or come second or third in a race Also both ways US term across-the-board

  • Eacso

    /iːˈɑːksəʊ/ noun acronym 1. East African Common Services Organization

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