Elia



[ee-lee-uh] /ˈi li ə/

noun
1.
the pen name of .
[lam] /læm/
noun
1.
Charles (“Elia”) 1775–1834, English essayist and critic.
2.
Harold A. 1892–1962, U.S. novelist.
3.
Mary Ann, 1764–1847, English author who wrote in collaboration with her brother Charles Lamb.
4.
William, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, 1779–1848, English statesman: prime minister 1834, 1835–41.
5.
Willis E(ugene), Jr. 1913–2008, U.S. physicist: Nobel Prize 1955.
/ˈiːlɪə/
noun
1.
a department of SW Greece, in the W Peloponnese: in ancient times most of the region formed the state of Elis. Pop: 183 521 (2001). Area: 2681 sq km (1035 sq miles) Modern Greek name Ilía
/ˈiːlɪə/
noun
1.
the pen name of (Charles) Lamb
/læm/
noun
1.
the young of a sheep
2.
the meat of a young sheep
3.
a person, esp a child, who is innocent, meek, good, etc
4.
a person easily deceived
5.
like a lamb to the slaughter

verb
6.
(intransitive) Also lamb down. (of a ewe) to give birth
7.
(transitive; used in the passive) (of a lamb) to be born
8.
(intransitive) (of a shepherd) to tend the ewes and newborn lambs at lambing time
/læm/
noun
1.
the Lamb, a title given to Christ in the New Testament
/læm/
noun
1.
Charles, pen name Elia. 1775–1834, English essayist and critic. He collaborated with his sister Mary on Tales from Shakespeare (1807). His other works include Specimens of English Dramatic Poets (1808) and the largely autobiographical essays collected in Essays of Elia (1823; 1833)
2.
William. See (2nd Viscount) Melbourne2
3.
Willis Eugene. 1913–2008, US physicist. He detected the small difference in energy between two states of the hydrogen atom (Lamb shift). Nobel prize for physics 1955
n.

Old English lamb “lamb,” from Proto-Germanic *lambaz (cf. Old Norse, Old Frisian, Gothic lamb, Middle Dutch, Dutch lam, Middle High German lamp, German Lamm “lamb”). Common to the Germanic languages, but with no certain cognates outside them. Old English plural was lomberu. Applied to persons (especially young Church members, gentle souls, etc.) from late Old English. Also sometimes used ironically for cruel or rough characters (e.g. Kirke’s Lambs in wars of 1684-86). Lamb’s-wool (adj.) is from 1550s.

noun

A dear, sweet person: Mary is such a lamb (1923+)

(1.) Heb. kebes, a male lamb from the first to the third year. Offered daily at the morning and the evening sacrifice (Ex. 29:38-42), on the Sabbath day (Num. 28:9), at the feast of the New Moon (28:11), of Trumpets (29:2), of Tabernacles (13-40), of Pentecost (Lev. 23:18-20), and of the Passover (Ex. 12:5), and on many other occasions (1 Chr. 29:21; 2 Chr. 29:21; Lev. 9:3; 14:10-25). (2.) Heb. taleh, a young sucking lamb (1 Sam. 7:9; Isa. 65:25). In the symbolical language of Scripture the lamb is the type of meekness and innocence (Isa. 11:6; 65:25; Luke 10:3; John 21:15). The lamb was a symbol of Christ (Gen. 4:4; Ex. 12:3; 29:38; Isa. 16:1; 53:7; John 1:36; Rev. 13:8). Christ is called the Lamb of God (John 1:29, 36), as the great sacrifice of which the former sacrifices were only types (Num. 6:12; Lev. 14:12-17; Isa. 53:7; 1 Cor. 5:7).

see:

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Eliab

    to whom God is father. (1.) A Reubenite, son of Pallu (Num. 16:1, 12; 26:8, 9; Deut. 11:6). (2.) A son of Helon, and chief of the tribe of Zebulun at the time of the census in the wilderness (Num. 1:9; 2:7). (3.) The son of Jesse, and brother of David (1 Sam. 16:6). It […]

  • Eliada

    whom God cares for. (1.) One of David’s sons born after his establishment in Jerusalem (2 Sam. 5:16). (2.) A mighty man of war, a Benjamite (2 Chr. 17:17). (3.) An Aramite of Zobah, captain of a marauding band that troubled Solomon (1 Kings 11:23).



  • Eliade

    /Romanian eˈljaːde/ noun 1. Mircea. 1907–86, Romanian scholar and writer, noted for his study of religious symbolism. His works include Patterns of Comparative Religion (1949)

  • Elias

    [ih-lahy-uh s] /ɪˈlaɪ əs/ noun 1. Douay Bible. (def 1). 2. a male given name, Greek form of . /ɪˈlaɪəs/ noun 1. (Bible) the Douay spelling of Elijah the Greek form of Elijah (Matt. 11:14; 16:14, etc.), which the Revised Version has uniformly adopted in the New Testament. (See ELIJAH.)



Disclaimer: Elia definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.