Epicure



[ep-i-kyoo r] /ˈɛp ɪˌkyʊər/

noun
1.
a person who cultivates a refined taste, especially in food and wine; connoisseur.
2.
Archaic. a person dedicated to sensual enjoyment.
/ˈɛpɪˌkjʊə/
noun
1.
a person who cultivates a discriminating palate for the enjoyment of good food and drink; gourmet
2.
a person devoted to sensual pleasures
n.

late 14c., “follower of Epicurus,” from Latin Epicurus, from Greek Epicouros (341-270 B.C.E.), Athenian philosopher who taught that pleasure is the highest good and identified virtue as the greatest pleasure; the first lesson recalled, the second forgotten, and the name used pejoratively for “one who gives himself up to sensual pleasure” (1560s), especially “glutton, sybarite” (1774). Epicurus’ school opposed by stoics, who first gave his name a reproachful sense. Non-pejorative meaning “one who cultivates refined taste in food and drink” is from 1580s.

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  • Epicureanism

    [ep-i-kyoo-ree-uh-niz-uh m, -kyoo r-ee-] /ˌɛp ɪ kyʊˈri əˌnɪz əm, -ˈkyʊər i-/ noun 1. the philosophical system or doctrine of Epicurus, holding that the external world is a series of fortuitous combinations of atoms and that the highest good is pleasure, interpreted as freedom from disturbance or pain. 2. (lowercase) indulgence or habits. n. 1751, with […]

  • Epicureans

    [ep-i-kyoo-ree-uh n, -kyoo r-ee-] /ˌɛp ɪ kyʊˈri ən, -ˈkyʊər i-/ adjective 1. fond of or adapted to luxury or indulgence in sensual pleasures; having luxurious tastes or habits, especially in eating and drinking. 2. fit for an : epicurean delicacies. 3. (initial capital letter) of, relating to, or characteristic of Epicurus or . noun 4. […]



  • Epicureous

    adj. “epicurean,” 1550s, from Latin epicureus, from Greek epikoureios (see epicure).

  • Epicurism

    [ep-i-kyoo-ree-uh-niz-uh m, -kyoo r-ee-] /ˌɛp ɪ kyʊˈri əˌnɪz əm, -ˈkyʊər i-/ noun 1. the philosophical system or doctrine of Epicurus, holding that the external world is a series of fortuitous combinations of atoms and that the highest good is pleasure, interpreted as freedom from disturbance or pain. 2. (lowercase) indulgence or habits. n. 1751, with […]



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