Exception



[ik-sep-shuh n] /ɪkˈsɛp ʃən/

noun
1.
the act of excepting or the fact of being excepted.
2.
something excepted; an instance or case not conforming to the general rule.
3.
an adverse criticism, especially on a particular point; opposition of opinion; objection; demurral:
a statement liable to exception.
4.
Law.

Idioms
5.
take exception,

/ɪkˈsɛpʃən/
noun
1.
the act of excepting or fact of being excepted; omission
2.
anything excluded from or not in conformance with a general rule, principle, class, etc
3.
criticism, esp when it is adverse; objection
4.
(law) (formerly) a formal objection in the course of legal proceedings
5.
(law) a clause or term in a document that restricts the usual legal effect of the document
6.
take exception

n.

late 14c., from Anglo-French excepcioun, Old French excepcion, from Latin exceptionem (nominative exceptio), noun of action from past participle stem of excipere (see except).

The exception that proves the rule is from law: exceptio probat regulam in casibus non exceptis, “the exception proves the rule in cases not excepted;” exception here being “action of excepting” someone or something from the rule in question, not the person or thing that is excepted. To take exception is from excipere being used in Roman law as a modern attorney would say objection.

An error condition that changes the normal flow of control in a program. An exception may be generated (“raised”) by hardware or software. Hardware exceptions include reset, interrupt or a signal from a memory management unit. Exceptions may be generated by the arithmetic logic unit or floating-point unit for numerical errors such as divide by zero, overflow or underflow or instruction decoding errors such as privileged, reserved, trap or undefined instructions. Software exceptions are even more varied and the term could be applied to any kind of error checking which alters the normal behaviour of the program.
(1994-10-31)
In addition to the idioms beginning with exception
exception proves the rule, the

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  • Exceptionable

    [ik-sep-shuh-nuh-buh l] /ɪkˈsɛp ʃə nə bəl/ adjective 1. liable to or objection; objectionable. /ɪkˈsɛpʃənəbəl/ adjective 1. open to or subject to objection; objectionable adj. 1660s, from exception + -able. Related: Exceptionably.

  • Exceptional

    [ik-sep-shuh-nl] /ɪkˈsɛp ʃə nl/ adjective 1. forming an exception or rare instance; unusual; extraordinary: The warm weather was exceptional for January. 2. unusually excellent; superior: an exceptional violinist. 3. Education. /ɪkˈsɛpʃənəl/ adjective 1. forming an exception; not ordinary 2. having much more than average intelligence, ability, or skill 1846, from exception + -al (1). Related: […]



  • Exceptionalism

    [ik-sep-shuh-nl-iz-uh m] /ɪkˈsɛp ʃə nlˌɪz əm/ noun 1. the condition of being exceptional; uniqueness. 2. the study of the unique and exceptional. 3. a theory that a nation, region, or political system is exceptional and does not conform to the norm. /ɪkˈsɛpʃənəlɪzəm/ noun 1. an attitude to other countries, cultures, etc based on the idea […]

  • Exceptionality

    [ik-sep-shuh-nl] /ɪkˈsɛp ʃə nl/ adjective 1. forming an exception or rare instance; unusual; extraordinary: The warm weather was exceptional for January. 2. unusually excellent; superior: an exceptional violinist. 3. Education. /ɪkˈsɛpʃənəl/ adjective 1. forming an exception; not ordinary 2. having much more than average intelligence, ability, or skill 1846, from exception + -al (1). Related: […]



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