Exigency



[ek-si-juh n-see, ig-zij-uh n-] /ˈɛk sɪ dʒən si, ɪgˈzɪdʒ ən-/

noun, plural exigencies.
1.
state or character; urgency.
2.
Usually, exigencies. the need, demand, or requirement intrinsic to a circumstance, condition, etc.:
the exigencies of city life.
3.
a case or situation that demands prompt action or remedy; emergency:
He promised help in any exigency.
/ˈɛksɪdʒənsɪ; ɪɡˈzɪdʒənsɪ/
noun (pl) -gencies, -gences
1.
the state of being exigent; urgency
2.
(often pl) an urgent demand; pressing requirement
3.
an emergency
n.

1580s, from Middle French exigence, from Latin exigentia “urgency,” from exigentem (nominative exigens), from exigere “to demand, require; drive out” (see exact (v.)). Related: Exigencies (1650s).

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  • Exigent

    [ek-si-juh nt] /ˈɛk sɪ dʒənt/ adjective 1. requiring immediate action or aid; urgent; pressing. 2. requiring a great deal, or more than is reasonable. /ˈɛksɪdʒənt/ adjective 1. urgent; pressing 2. exacting; demanding adj. 1660s, “urgent,” a back-formation from exigency or else from Latin exigentem (nominative exigens), present participle of exigere “to demand” (see exact (v.)).

  • Exigible

    [ek-si-juh-buh l] /ˈɛk sɪ dʒə bəl/ adjective 1. liable to be exacted; requirable. /ˈɛksɪdʒəbəl/ adjective 1. liable to be exacted or required: part of the debt is exigible this month



  • Exiguity

    [ig-zig-yoo-uh s, ik-sig-] /ɪgˈzɪg yu əs, ɪkˈsɪg-/ adjective 1. scanty; meager; small; slender: exiguous income. /ɪɡˈzɪɡjʊəs; ɪkˈsɪɡ-/ adjective 1. scanty or slender; meagre: an exiguous income noun inadequacy; scantiness; littleness Word Origin Latin exiguus ‘scanty’ adj. “scanty,” 1650s, from Latin exiguus “small, petty, paltry, scanty in measure or number,” from exigere (see exact).

  • Exiguous

    [ig-zig-yoo-uh s, ik-sig-] /ɪgˈzɪg yu əs, ɪkˈsɪg-/ adjective 1. scanty; meager; small; slender: exiguous income. /ɪɡˈzɪɡjʊəs; ɪkˈsɪɡ-/ adjective 1. scanty or slender; meagre: an exiguous income adj. “scanty,” 1650s, from Latin exiguus “small, petty, paltry, scanty in measure or number,” from exigere (see exact).



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