Faustian bargain

Faustian bargain [(fow-stee-uhn)]

Faust, in the legend, traded his soul to the devil in exchange for knowledge. To “strike a Faustian bargain” is to be willing to sacrifice anything to satisfy a limitless desire for knowledge or power.


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