Fiddling



[fid-ling] /ˈfɪd lɪŋ/

adjective
1.
trifling; trivial:
a fiddling sum of money.
[fid-l] /ˈfɪd l/
noun
1.
a musical instrument of the viol family.
2.
violin:
Her aunt plays first fiddle with the state symphony orchestra.
3.
Nautical. a small ledge or barrier raised in heavy weather to keep dishes, pots, utensils, etc., from sliding off tables and stoves.
4.
British Informal. swindle; fraud.
verb (used without object), fiddled, fiddling.
5.
to play on the fiddle.
6.
to make trifling or fussing movements with the hands (often followed by with):
fiddling with his cuffs.
7.
to touch or manipulate something, as to operate or adjust it; tinker (often followed by with):
You may have to fiddle with the antenna to get a clear picture on the TV.
8.
to waste time; trifle; dally (often followed by around):
Stop fiddling around and get to work.
9.
British Informal. to cheat.
verb (used with object), fiddled, fiddling.
10.
to play (a tune) on a fiddle.
11.
to trifle or waste (usually used with away):
to fiddle time away.
12.
Bookbinding. to bind together (sections or leaves of a book) by threading a cord through holes cut lengthwise into the back.
13.
British Informal.

Idioms
14.
fine as a fiddle, South Midland and Southern U.S. (def 15).
15.
fit as a fiddle, in perfect health; very fit:
The doctor told him he was fit as a fiddle.
Also, as fit as a fiddle.
16.
play second fiddle. .
/ˈfɪdlɪŋ/
adjective
1.
trifling or insignificant; petty
2.
another word for fiddly
/ˈfɪdəl/
noun
1.
(informal) any instrument of the viol or violin family, esp the violin
2.
a violin played as a folk instrument
3.
time-wasting or trifling behaviour; nonsense; triviality
4.
(nautical) a small railing around the top of a table to prevent objects from falling off it in bad weather
5.
(Brit, informal) an illegal or fraudulent transaction or arrangement
6.
(Brit, informal) a manually delicate or tricky operation
7.
(informal) at the fiddle, on the fiddle, engaged in an illegal or fraudulent undertaking
8.
(informal) face as long as a fiddle, a dismal or gloomy facial expression
9.
(informal) fit as a fiddle, in very good health
10.
(informal) play second fiddle, to be subordinate; play a minor part
verb
11.
to play (a tune) on the fiddle
12.
(intransitive) often foll by with. to make restless or aimless movements with the hands
13.
(informal) when intr, often foll by about or around. to spend (time) or act in a careless or inconsequential manner; waste (time)
14.
(often foll by with) (informal) to tamper or interfere (with)
15.
(informal) to contrive to do (something) by illicit means or deception: he fiddled his way into a position of trust
16.
(transitive) (informal) to falsify (accounts, etc); swindle
n.

late 14c., fedele, earlier fithele, from Old English fiðele, which is related to Old Norse fiðla, Middle Dutch vedele, Dutch vedel, Old High German fidula, German Fiedel; all of uncertain origin.

Perhaps from Medieval Latin vitula “stringed instrument,” which is perhaps related to Latin vitularia “celebrate joyfully,” from Vitula, Roman goddess of joy and victory, who probably, like her name, originated among the Sabines [Klein, Barnhart]. Unless the Medieval Latin word is from the Germanic ones.

Fiddle has been relegated to colloquial usage by its more proper cousin, violin, a process encouraged by phraseology such as fiddlesticks, contemptuous nonsense word fiddlededee (1784), and fiddle-faddle. Fit as a fiddle is from 1610s.
v.

late 14c., from fiddle (n.); the figurative sense of “to act nervously or idly” is from 1520s. Related: Fiddled; fiddling.

Another name for the violin; fiddle is the more common term for the instrument as played in folk music and bluegrass.

noun

: His new boat is a tax fiddle (1874+)

verb

Related Terms

bull fiddle, git-box, play second fiddle, second fiddle
In addition to the idiom beginning with
fiddle

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Field of honour

    noun 1. the place or scene of a battle or duel, esp of jousting tournaments in medieval times

  • Field-of-quotients

    noun, Mathematics. 1. a field whose elements are pairs of elements of a given commutative integral domain such that the second element of each pair is not zero. The field of rational numbers is the field of quotients of the integral domain of integers.



  • Field-of-view

    noun, Optics. 1. (def 13).

  • Field-of-vision

    noun 1. the entire view encompassed by the eye when it is trained in any particular direction.



Disclaimer: Fiddling definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.