Friedrich list



[list] /lɪst/

noun
1.
Friedrich
[free-drik] /ˈfri drɪk/ (Show IPA), 1789–1846, U.S. political economist and journalist, born in Germany.
/lɪst/
noun
1.
an item-by-item record of names or things, usually written or printed one under the other
2.
(computing) a linearly ordered data structure
3.
be on the danger list, to be in a critical medical or physical condition
verb
4.
(transitive) to make a list of
5.
(transitive) to include in a list
6.
(transitive) (Brit) to declare to be a listed building
7.
(transitive) (stock exchange) to obtain an official quotation for (a security) so that it may be traded on the recognized market
8.
an archaic word for enlist
/lɪst/
verb
1.
(esp of ships) to lean over or cause to lean over to one side
noun
2.
the act or an instance of leaning to one side
/lɪst/
noun
1.
a border or edging strip, esp of cloth
2.
a less common word for selvage
3.
a strip of bark, sapwood, etc, trimmed from a board or plank
4.
another word for fillet (sense 8)
5.
a strip, band, ridge or furrow
6.
(agriculture) a ridge in ploughed land formed by throwing two furrows together
verb (transitive)
7.
to border with or as if with a list or lists
8.
(agriculture) to plough (land) so as to form lists
9.
to cut a list from (a board, plank, etc)
/lɪst/
verb
1.
to be pleasing to (a person)
2.
(transitive) to desire or choose
noun
3.
a liking or desire
/lɪst/
verb
1.
an archaic or poetic word for listen
n.

“catalogue consisting of names in a row or series,” c.1600, from Middle English liste “border, edging, stripe” (late 13c.), from Old French liste “border, band, row, group,” also “strip of paper,” or from Old Italian lista “border, strip of paper, list,” both from a Germanic source (cf. Old High German lista “strip, border, list,” Old Norse lista “border, selvage,” Old English liste “border”), from Proto-Germanic *liston, from PIE *leizd- “border, band.” The sense of “enumeration” is from strips of paper used as a sort of catalogue.

“a narrow strip,” Old English liste “border, hem, edge, strip,” from Proto-Germanic *liston (cf. Old High German lista “strip, border, list,” Old Norse lista “border, selvage,”German leiste), from PIE *leizd- “border, band” (see list (n.1)). The Germanic root also is the source of French liste, Italian lista. This was the source of archaic lists “place of combat,” originally at the boundary of fields.
v.

“tilt, lean,” especially of a ship, 1880, earlier (1620s) lust, of unknown origin, perhaps an unexplained spelling variant of Middle English lysten “to please, desire, wish, like” (see list (v.4)) with a sense development from the notion of “leaning” toward what one desires (cf. incline). Related: Listed; listing. The noun in this sense is from 1630s.

“hear, hearken,” now poetic or obsolete, from Old English hlystan “hear, hearken,” from hlyst “hearing,” from Proto-Germanic *khlustiz, from PIE *kleu- “to hear” (see listen). Related: Listed; listing.

“to put down in a list; to make a list of,” 1610s, from list (n.1). Meaning “to place real estate on the market” is from 1904. Attested from c.1300 as “put an edge around,” from list (n.2). Related: Listed; listing.

“to be pleased, desire” (archaic), mid-12c., lusten, listen “to please, desire,” from Old English lystan “to please, cause pleasure or desire, provoke longing,” from Proto-Germanic *lustijan (cf. Old Saxon lustian, Dutch lusten “to like, fancy,” Old High German lusten, German lüsten, Old Norse lysta); from the root of lust (n.). Related: Listed; listing. As a noun, c.1200, from the verb. Somehow English has lost listy (adj.) “pleasant, willing (to do something); ready, quick” (mid-15c.).

Related Terms

hit list, shit list, sucker list, wish list
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