Gore



[gawr, gohr] /gɔr, goʊr/

noun
1.
blood that is shed, especially when clotted.
2.
murder, bloodshed, violence, etc.:
That horror movie had too much gore.
[gawr, gohr] /gɔr, goʊr/
verb (used with object), gored, goring.
1.
to pierce with or as if with a horn or tusk.
[gawr, gohr] /gɔr, goʊr/
noun
1.
a triangular piece of material inserted in a garment, sail, etc., to give it greater width or a desired shape.
Compare (def 1), (def 1).
2.
one of the panels, usually tapering or shaped, making up a garment, as a skirt.
3.
a triangular tract of land, especially one lying between larger divisions.
verb (used with object), gored, goring.
4.
to make or furnish with a gore or gores.
[gawr-ey, gohr-ey] /ˈgɔr eɪ, ˈgoʊr eɪ/
noun
1.
a city in W Ethiopia.
[gawr, gohr] /gɔr, goʊr/
noun
1.
Albert Arnold, Jr (“Al”) born 1948, U.S. politician: vice president of the U.S. 1993–2001.
/ɡɔː/
noun
1.
blood shed from a wound, esp when coagulated
2.
(informal) killing, fighting, etc
/ɡɔː/
verb
1.
(transitive) (of an animal, such as a bull) to pierce or stab (a person or another animal) with a horn or tusk
/ɡɔː/
noun
1.
a tapering or triangular piece of material used in making a shaped skirt, umbrella, etc
2.
a similarly shaped piece, esp of land
verb
3.
(transitive) to make into or with a gore or gores
/ɡɔː/
noun
1.
Al(bert) Jr. born 1948, US Democrat politician; vice president of the US (1993–2001); defeated in the disputed presidential election of 2000; leading environmental campaigner; shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with the Intergovernmental Panel For Climate Change
n.

Old English gor “dirt, dung, filth, shit,” a Germanic word (cf. Middle Dutch goor “filth, mud;” Old Norse gor “cud;” Old High German gor “animal dung”), of uncertain origin. Sense of “clotted blood” (especially shed in battle) developed by 1560s.

“triangular piece of ground,” Old English gara, related to gar “spear” (see gar), on the notion of “triangularity.” Hence also meanings “front of a skirt” (mid-13c.), and “triangular piece of cloth” (early 14c.).
v.

c.1400, from Scottish gorren “to pierce, stab,” origin unknown, perhaps related to Old English gar “spear” (see gar, also gore (n.2) “triangular piece of ground”). Related: Gored; goring.

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  • Gored

    [gawr, gohr] /gɔr, goʊr/ verb (used with object), gored, goring. 1. to pierce with or as if with a horn or tusk. [gawr, gohr] /gɔr, goʊr/ noun 1. a triangular piece of material inserted in a garment, sail, etc., to give it greater width or a desired shape. Compare (def 1), (def 1). 2. one […]

  • Gorehound

    /ˈɡɔːˌhaʊnd/ noun 1. an enthusiast of gory horror films



  • Goren

    [gawr-eyn] /ˈgɔr eɪn/ noun 1. Charles Henry, 1901–91, U.S authority and writer on contract bridge.

  • Gore-Tex

    [gawr-teks, gohr-] /ˈgɔrˌtɛks, ˈgoʊr-/ Trademark. 1. a brand of breathable, water-repellent fabric laminate used on clothing, shoes, etc. /ˈɡɔːˌtɛks/ noun 1. trademark a type of synthetic fabric which is waterproof yet allows the wearer’s skin to breathe; used for sportswear



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