Gust



[guhst] /gʌst/

noun
1.
a sudden, strong blast of wind.
2.
a sudden rush or burst of water, fire, smoke, sound, etc.
3.
an outburst of passionate feeling.
verb (used without object)
4.
to blow or rush in gusts.
[guhst] /gʌst/
noun
1.
Archaic. flavor or taste.
2.
Obsolete. enjoyment or gratification.
verb (used with object)
3.
Scot. to taste; savor.
/ɡʌst/
noun
1.
a sudden blast of wind
2.
a sudden rush of smoke, sound, etc
3.
an outburst of emotion
verb (intransitive)
4.
to blow in gusts: the wind was gusting to more than 50 mph
n.

1580s, possibly a dialectal survival from Old Norse gustr “a cold blast of wind” (related to gusa “to gush, spurt”) or Old High German gussa “flood,” both from Proto-Germanic *gustiz, from PIE *gheus-, from root *gheu- “to pour” (see found (2)). Probably originally in English as a nautical term. As a verb, from 1813. Related: Gusted; gusting.

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  • Gustation

    [guh-stey-shuh n] /gʌˈsteɪ ʃən/ noun 1. the act of tasting. 2. the faculty of taste. /ɡʌˈsteɪʃən/ noun 1. the act of tasting or the faculty of taste n. “act of tasting,” 1590s, from Latin gustationem (nominative gustatio), noun of action from past participle stem of gustare “to taste” (see gusto). gustation gus·ta·tion (gŭ-stā’shən) n.

  • Gustative

    [guhs-tuh-tiv] /ˈgʌs tə tɪv/ adjective 1. .



  • Gustatory

    [guhs-tuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /ˈgʌs təˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/ adjective 1. of or relating to taste or tasting. adj. 1680s, from Latin gustatus “sense of taste; a taste,” noun use of past participle of gustare “to taste” (see gusto) + -ory. gustatory gus·ta·to·ry (gŭs’tə-tôr’ē) or gus·ta·tive (-tə-tĭv) adj. Of or relating to the sense of taste.

  • Gustatory cell

    gustatory cell n. See taste cell.



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