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Halter



[hawl-ter] /ˈhɔl tər/

noun
1.
a rope or strap with a noose or headstall for leading or restraining horses or cattle.
2.
a rope with a noose for hanging criminals; the hangman’s noose; gallows.
3.
death by hanging.
4.
Also called halter top. a woman’s top, secured behind the neck and across the back, leaving the arms, shoulders, upperback, and often the midriff bare.
verb (used with object)
5.
to put a halter on; restrain as by a halter.
6.
to hang (a person).
adjective
7.
(of a garment) having a neckline consisting of a cord, strap, band, or the like that is attached to or forms part of the front of a backless and sleeveless bodice and extends around the neck:
a halter dress.
[hal-ter] /ˈhæl tər/
noun, plural halteres
[hal-teer-eez] /hælˈtɪər iz/ (Show IPA)
1.
one of a pair of slender, club-shaped appendages on the hindmost body segment of a fly, serving to maintain its balance in flight.
[hawl-ter] /ˈhɔl tər/
noun
1.
a person who halts or brings to a stop.
[hawl-ter] /ˈhɔl tər/
noun
1.
a person who halts, falters, or hesitates.
[hawlt] /hɔlt/
verb (used without object)
1.
to falter, as in speech, reasoning, etc.; be hesitant; stumble.
2.
to be in doubt; waver between alternatives; vacillate.
3.
Archaic. to be lame; walk lamely; limp.
adjective
4.
Archaic. lame; limping.
noun
5.
Archaic. lameness; a limp.
6.
(used with a plural verb) lame people, especially severely lamed ones (usually preceded by the):
the halt and the blind.
/ˈhɔːltə/
noun
1.
a rope or canvas headgear for a horse, usually with a rope for leading
2.
Also called halterneck. a style of woman’s top fastened behind the neck and waist, leaving the back and arms bare
3.
a rope having a noose for hanging a person
4.
death by hanging
verb (transitive)
5.
to secure with a halter or put a halter on
6.
to hang (someone)
/hɔːlt/
noun
1.
an interruption or end to activity, movement, or progress
2.
(mainly Brit) a minor railway station, without permanent buildings
3.
call a halt, to put an end (to something); stop
noun, sentence substitute
4.
a command to halt, esp as an order when marching
verb
5.
to come or bring to a halt
/hɔːlt/
verb (intransitive)
1.
(esp of logic or verse) to falter or be defective
2.
to waver or be unsure
3.
(archaic) to be lame
adjective
4.
(archaic)

noun
5.
(archaic) lameness
n.

Old English hælftre “rope for leading a horse,” from West Germanic *halftra- “that by which something is held” (cf. Old Saxon haliftra “halter,” Old High German halftra, Middle Dutch halfter; see helve). In women’s clothing sense, originally “strap attached to the top of a backless bodice and looped around the neck,” 1935, later extended to the tops themselves.
n.

“a stop, a halting,” 1590s, from French halte (16c.) or Italian alto, ultimately from German Halt, imperative from Old High German halten “to hold” (see hold (v.)). A German military command borrowed into the Romanic languages 16c. The verb in this sense is from 1650s, from the noun. Related: Halted; halting.
adj.

“lame,” in Old English lemphalt “limping,” from Proto-Germanic *haltaz (cf. Old Saxon, Old Frisian halt, Old Norse haltr, Old High German halz, Gothic halts “lame”), from PIE *keld-, from root *kel- “to strike, cut,” with derivatives meaning “something broken or cut off” (cf. Russian koldyka “lame,” Greek kolobos “broken, curtailed”). The noun meaning “one who limps; the lame collectively” is from c.1200.
v.

“to walk unsteadily,” early 14c., from Old English haltian “to be lame,” from the same source as halt (adj.). The meaning “make a halt” is 1650s, from halt (n.). As a command word, attested from 1796. Related: Halted; halting.

lame on the feet (Gen. 32:31; Ps. 38:17). To “halt between two opinions” (1 Kings 18:21) is supposed by some to be an expression used in “allusion to birds, which hop from spray to spray, forwards and backwards.” The LXX. render the expression “How long go ye lame on both knees?” The Hebrew verb rendered “halt” is used of the irregular dance (“leaped upon”) around the altar (ver. 26). It indicates a lame, uncertain gait, going now in one direction, now in another, in the frenzy of wild leaping.

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  • Haltere

    /ˈhæltɪə/ noun (pl) halteres (hælˈtɪəriːz) 1. one of a pair of short projections in dipterous insects that are modified hind wings, used for maintaining equilibrium during flight Also called balancer

  • Halting

    [hawl-ting] /ˈhɔl tɪŋ/ adjective 1. faltering or hesitating, especially in speech. 2. faulty or imperfect. 3. limping or lame: a halting gait. [hawlt] /hɔlt/ verb (used without object) 1. to stop; cease moving, operating, etc., either permanently or temporarily: They halted for lunch and strolled about. verb (used with object) 2. to cause to stop […]



  • Haltingly

    [hawl-ting] /ˈhɔl tɪŋ/ adjective 1. faltering or hesitating, especially in speech. 2. faulty or imperfect. 3. limping or lame: a halting gait. /ˈhɔːltɪŋ/ adjective 1. hesitant: halting speech 2. lame n. “act of limping or walking lamely,” early 14c., verbal noun from halt (v.). Related: Haltingly.

  • Halting problem

    The problem of determining in advance whether a particular program or algorithm will terminate or run forever. The halting problem is the canonical example of a provably unsolvable problem. Obviously any attempt to answer the question by actually executing the algorithm or simulating each step of its execution will only give an answer if the […]



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