with great vigor, determination, or vehemence:
When he starts a job he goes at it hammer and tongs.

adverb phrase

Very violently; with full force: We went at each other hammer and tongs

[1708+; reflecting use of both the blacksmith’s main tools]
Forcefully, with great vigor. For example, She went at the weeds hammer and tongs, determined to clean out the long neglected flowerbed. Often put as go at it hammer and tongs, this phrase alludes to the blacksmith’s tools. [ c. 1700 ]


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