Hay



[hey] /heɪ/

noun
1.
grass, clover, alfalfa, etc., cut and dried for use as forage.
2.
grass mowed or intended for mowing.
3.
Slang.

4.
Slang. .
verb (used with object)
5.
to convert (plant material) into hay.
6.
to furnish (horses, cows, etc.) with hay.
verb (used without object)
7.
to cut grass, clover, or the like, and store for use as forage.
Idioms
8.
a roll in the hay, Slang. sexual intercourse.
9.
hit the hay, Informal. to go to bed:
It got to be past midnight before anyone thought of hitting the hay.
10.
in the hay, in bed; retired, especially for the night:
By ten o’clock he’s in the hay.
11.
make hay of, to scatter in disorder; render ineffectual:
The destruction of the manuscript made hay of two years of painstaking labor.
12.
make hay while the sun shines, to seize an opportunity when it presents itself:
If you want to be a millionaire, you have to make hay while the sun shines.
Also, make hay.
[hey] /heɪ/
noun
1.
John Milton, 1838–1905, U.S. statesman and author.
2.
a river in NW Canada, flowing NE to the Great Slave Lake. 530 miles (853 km) long.
/heɪ/
noun
1.

2.
(slang) hit the hay, to go to bed
3.
make hay of, to throw into confusion
4.
make hay while the sun shines, to take full advantage of an opportunity
5.
(informal) roll in the hay, sexual intercourse or heavy petting
verb
6.
to cut, dry, and store (grass, clover, etc) as fodder
7.
(transitive) to feed with hay
/heɪ/
noun
1.
a circular figure in country dancing
2.
a former country dance in which the dancers wove in and out of a circle
/heɪ/
noun
1.
Will. 1888–1949, British music-hall comedian, who later starred in films, such as Oh, Mr Porter! (1937)
n.

“grass mown,” Old English heg (Anglian), hieg, hig (West Saxon) “grass cut or mown for fodder,” from Proto-Germanic *haujam (cf. Old Norse hey, Old Frisian ha, Middle Dutch hoy, German Heu, Gothic hawi “hay”), literally “that which is cut,” or “that which can be mowed,” from PIE *kau- “to hew, strike” (cf. Old English heawan “to cut;” see hew). Slang phrase hit the hay (pre-1880) was originally “to sleep in a barn;” hay in the general figurative sense of “bedding” (e.g. roll in the hay) is from 1903.

noun

Marijuana; herb

Related Terms

hit the hay, indian hay, that ain’t hay

[Narcotics; 1940s+]

properly so called, was not in use among the Hebrews; straw was used instead. They cut the grass green as it was needed. The word rendered “hay” in Prov. 27:25 means the first shoots of the grass. In Isa. 15:6 the Revised Version has correctly “grass,” where the Authorized Version has “hay.”

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