Hebrews



[hee-brooz] /ˈhi bruz/

noun, (used with a singular verb)
1.
a book of the New Testament.
Abbreviation: Heb.
[hee-broo] /ˈhi bru/
noun
1.
a member of the Semitic peoples inhabiting ancient Palestine and claiming descent from Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; an Israelite.
2.
a Semitic language of the Afroasiatic family, the language of the ancient Hebrews, which, although not in a vernacular use from 100 b.c. to the 20th century, was retained as the scholarly and liturgical language of Jews and is now the national language of Israel.
Abbreviation: Heb.
adjective
3.
.
4.
noting or pertaining to the script developed from the Aramaic and early alphabets, used since about the 3rd century b.c. for the writing of Hebrew, and later for Yiddish, Ladino, and other languages.
/ˈhiːbruːz/
noun
1.
(functioning as sing) a book of the New Testament
/ˈhiːbruː/
noun
1.
the ancient language of the Hebrews, revived as the official language of Israel. It belongs to the Canaanitic branch of the Semitic subfamily of the Afro-Asiatic family of languages
2.
a member of an ancient Semitic people claiming descent from Abraham; an Israelite
3.
(archaic or offensive) a Jew
adjective
4.
of or relating to the Hebrews or their language
5.
(archaic or offensive) Jewish
adj.

late Old English, from Old French Ebreu, from Latin Hebraeus, from Greek Hebraios, from Aramaic ‘ebhrai, corresponding to Hebrew ‘ibhri “an Israelite,” literally “one from the other side,” in reference to the River Euphrates, or perhaps simply signifying “immigrant;” from ‘ebher “region on the other or opposite side.” The noun is c.1200, “the Hebrew language;” late 14c. of persons, originally “a biblical Jew, Israelite.”

The descendants of Abraham and Isaac, especially the descendants of Isaac’s son Jacob; the Israelites.

The language of the Hebrews, in which the Old Testament was written. It is the language of the modern state of Israel.

(Acts 6:1) were the Hebrew-speaking Jews, as distinguished from those who spoke Greek. (See GREEKS.)

a name applied to the Israelites in Scripture only by one who is a foreigner (Gen. 39:14, 17; 41:12, etc.), or by the Israelites when they speak of themselves to foreigners (40:15; Ex. 1:19), or when spoken of an contrasted with other peoples (Gen. 43:32; Ex. 1:3, 7, 15; Deut. 15:12). In the New Testament there is the same contrast between Hebrews and foreigners (Acts 6:1; Phil. 3:5). Derivation. (1.) The name is derived, according to some, from Eber (Gen. 10:24), the ancestor of Abraham. The Hebrews are “sons of Eber” (10:21). (2.) Others trace the name of a Hebrew root-word signifying “to pass over,” and hence regard it as meaning “the man who passed over,” viz., the Euphrates; or to the Hebrew word meaning “the region” or “country beyond,” viz., the land of Chaldea. This latter view is preferred. It is the more probable origin of the designation given to Abraham coming among the Canaanites as a man from beyond the Euphrates (Gen. 14:13). (3.) A third derivation of the word has been suggested, viz., that it is from the Hebrew word _’abhar_, “to pass over,” whence _’ebher_, in the sense of a “sojourner” or “passer through” as distinct from a “settler” in the land, and thus applies to the condition of Abraham (Heb. 11:13).

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