High as a kite



adjective phrase

Intoxicated or exhilarated to an important degree (1939+)
Intoxicated, as by alcohol, as in After three beers she’s high as a kite. The adjective high has been used in the sense of “drunk” since the early 1600s; the addition of kite dates from the early 1900s. The phrase is now used of disorientation due to any drug.

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    [hahy-bawl] /ˈhaɪˌbɔl/ noun 1. a drink of whiskey mixed with club soda or ginger ale and served with ice in a tall glass. 2. Railroads. 3. Military Slang. a hand salute. verb (used without object) 4. Slang. to move at full speed. verb (used with object) 5. to signal to (the engineer of a train) […]

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  • High-beam

    noun 1. an automobile headlight beam providing bright, long-range illumination of a darkened road and chiefly for use in driving in nonurban areas.



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