[hob-suh n-job-suh n] /ˈhɒb sənˈdʒɒb sən/

the alteration of a word or phrase borrowed from a foreign language to accord more closely with the phonological and lexical patterns of the borrowing language, as in English hoosegow from Spanish juzgado.
another word for folk etymology

1690s, hossen gossen, said to have been British soldiers’ mangled Englishing of the Arabic cry they heard at Muharram processions in India, Ya Hasan! Ya Husayn! (“O Hassan! O Husain!”), mourning two grandsons of the Prophet who died fighting for the faith. Title of Yule & Burnell’s 1886 glossary of Anglo-Indian words, and taken by linguists in naming the law of Hobson-Jobson, describing the effort to bring a new and strange word into harmony with the language.


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