[hoo-ver-vil] /ˈhu vərˌvɪl/

a collection of huts and shacks, as at the edge of a city, housing the unemployed during the 1930s.

1933, American English, from U.S. president Herbert C. Hoover (1874-1964), who was in office when the Depression began, + common place-name ending -ville. Earlier his name was the basis of Hooverize “economize on food” (1917) from his role as wartime head of the U.S. Food Administration.

The encampments of the poor and homeless that sprang up during the Great Depression. They were named with ironic intent after President Herbert Hoover, who was in office when the depression started.


A slum of makeshift shacks where unemployed workers live

[1930s+; fr President Herbert Hoover, who was president during the early years of the Great Depression]


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