Hulling



[huhl-ing] /ˈhʌl ɪŋ/

noun
1.
material for the framework and shell of the of a ship.
[huhl] /hʌl/
noun
1.
the husk, shell, or outer covering of a seed or fruit.
2.
the calyx of certain fruits, as the strawberry.
3.
any covering or envelope.
verb (used with object)
4.
to remove the hull of.
5.
Midland U.S. to shell (peas or beans).
[huhl] /hʌl/
noun
1.
the hollow, lowermost portion of a ship, floating partially submerged and supporting the remainder of the ship.
2.
Aeronautics.

verb (used with object)
3.
to pierce (the hull of a ship), especially below the water line.
verb (used without object)
4.
to drift without power or sails.
Idioms
5.
hull down, (of a ship) sufficiently far away, or below the horizon, that the hull is invisible.
6.
hull up, (of a ship) sufficiently near, or above the horizon, that the hull is visible.
/hʌl/
noun
1.
the main body of a vessel, tank, flying boat, etc
2.
the shell or pod of peas or beans; the outer covering of any fruit or seed; husk
3.
the persistent calyx at the base of a strawberry, raspberry, or similar fruit
4.
the outer casing of a missile, rocket, etc
verb
5.
to remove the hulls from (fruit or seeds)
6.
(transitive) to pierce the hull of (a vessel, tank, etc)
/hʌl/
noun
1.
a city and port in NE England, in Kingston upon Hull unitary authority, East Riding of Yorkshire: fishing, food processing; two universities. Pop: 301 416 (2001). Official name: Kingston upon Hull
2.
a city in SE Canada, in SW Quebec on the River Ottawa: a centre of the timber trade and associated industries. Pop: 66 246 (2001)
/hʌl/
noun
1.
Cordell. 1871–1955, US statesman; secretary of state (1933–44). He helped to found the U.N.: Nobel peace prize 1945
n.

“seed covering,” from Old English hulu “husk, pod,” from Proto-Germanic *hulus “to cover” (cf. Old High German hulla, hulsa; German Hülle, Hülse, Dutch huls). Figurative use by 1831.

“body of a ship,” 1550s, perhaps from hull (n.1) on fancied resemblance of ship keels to open peapods (cf. Latin carina “keel of a ship,” originally “shell of a nut;” Greek phaselus “light passenger ship, yacht,” literally “bean pod;” French coque “hull of a ship; shell of a walnut or egg”). Alternative etymology is from Middle English hoole “ship’s keel” (mid-15c.), from the same source as hold (n.).
v.

“to remove the husk of,” early 15c., from hull (n.1). Related: Hulled, which can mean both “having a particular kind of hull” and “stripped of the hull.”
hull
(hŭl)

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  • Hullo

    [huh-loh] /həˈloʊ/ interjection, noun, plural hullos, verb (used with or without object), hulloed, hulloing. 1. . 2. Chiefly British. . /hʌˈləʊ/ sentence substitute, noun 1. a variant of hello call to attract attention, by 1828; see hello.

  • Hulloa

    [huh-loh, huhl-oh] /hʌˈloʊ, ˈhʌl oʊ/ Chiefly British interjection, noun, plural hulloas, verb (used with or without object), hulloaed, hulloaing. 1. .



  • Hulloo

    [huh-loo, huhl-oo] /hʌˈlu, ˈhʌl u/ interjection, noun, plural hulloos, verb (used with or without object), hullooed, hullooing. 1. .

  • Hull-up

    [huhl] /hʌl/ noun 1. the hollow, lowermost portion of a ship, floating partially submerged and supporting the remainder of the ship. 2. Aeronautics. verb (used with object) 3. to pierce (the hull of a ship), especially below the water line. verb (used without object) 4. to drift without power or sails. Idioms 5. hull down, […]



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