Hurry up and wait

verb phrase

To be rushed only to then have to wait: another hurry up and wait situation before the kids’ soccer game
Move quickly and then have to wait for something or someone. For example, We did our share in good time, but the others were several days behind so we couldn’t finish—it was another case of hurry up and wait. This expression dates from the 1940s and probably originated in the armed services.


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