Ignorable



[ig-nawr, -nohr] /ɪgˈnɔr, -ˈnoʊr/

verb (used with object), ignored, ignoring.
1.
to refrain from noticing or recognizing:
to ignore insulting remarks.
2.
Law. (of a grand jury) to reject (a bill of indictment), as on the grounds of insufficient evidence.
/ɪɡˈnɔː/
verb (transitive)
1.
to fail or refuse to notice; disregard
noun
2.
(Austral, informal) disregard: to treat someone with ignore
v.

1610s, “not to know, to be ignorant of,” from French ignorer “be unaware of,” from Latin ignorare “not to know, disregard” (see ignorant). Sense of “pay no attention to” first recorded 1801 (Barnhart says “probably a dictionary word”), and not common until c.1850. Related: Ignored; ignoring.

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    [ig-nuh-rey-muh s, -ram-uh s] /ˌɪg nəˈreɪ məs, -ˈræm əs/ noun, plural ignoramuses. 1. an extremely ignorant person. /ˌɪɡnəˈreɪməs/ noun (pl) -muses 1. an ignorant person; fool n. 1570s, from an Anglo-French legal term (early 15c.), from Latin ignoramus “we do not know,” first person present indicative of ignorare “not to know” (see ignorant). The legal […]

  • Ignorance

    [ig-ner-uh ns] /ˈɪg nər əns/ noun 1. the state or fact of being ; lack of knowledge, learning, information, etc. /ˈɪɡnərəns/ noun 1. lack of knowledge, information, or education; the state of being ignorant n. c.1200, from Old French ignorance (12c.), from Latin ignorantia “want of knowledge” (see ignorant).



  • Ignorance is bliss

    Not knowing something is often more comfortable than knowing it. Note: This proverb resembles “What you don’t know cannot hurt you.” It figures in a passage from “On a Distant Prospect of Eton College,” by the eighteenth-century English poet Thomas Gray: “Where ignorance is bliss, / ‘Tis folly to be wise.’” What you don’t know […]

  • Ignorances

    [ig-ner-uh ns] /ˈɪg nər əns/ noun 1. the state or fact of being ; lack of knowledge, learning, information, etc. /ˈɪɡnərəns/ noun 1. lack of knowledge, information, or education; the state of being ignorant n. c.1200, from Old French ignorance (12c.), from Latin ignorantia “want of knowledge” (see ignorant).



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