Impressional



[im-presh-uh n] /ɪmˈprɛʃ ən/

noun
1.
a strong effect produced on the intellect, feelings, conscience, etc.
2.
the first and immediate effect of an experience or perception upon the mind; sensation.
3.
the effect produced by an agency or influence.
4.
a notion, remembrance, belief, etc., often of a vague or indistinct nature:
He had a general impression of lights, voices, and the clinking of silver.
5.
a mark, indentation, figure, etc., produced by pressure.
6.
an image in the mind caused by something external to it.
7.
the act of impressing; state of being impressed.
8.
Dentistry. a mold taken, in plastic materials or plaster of Paris, of teeth and the surrounding tissues.
9.
an imitation of the voice, mannerisms, and other traits of a person, especially a famous person, as by an entertainer:
The comedian did a hilarious impression of the president.
10.
Chiefly Printing.

11.
Metalworking. a portion of a die having in reverse the intended form of an object to be forged.
/ɪmˈprɛʃən/
noun
1.
an effect produced in the mind by a stimulus; sensation: he gave the impression of wanting to help
2.
an imprint or mark produced by pressing: he left the impression of his finger in the mud
3.
a vague idea, consciousness, or belief: I had the impression we had met before
4.
a strong, favourable, or remarkable effect: he made an impression on the managers
5.
the act of impressing or the state of being impressed
6.
(printing)

7.
(dentistry) an imprint of the teeth and gums, esp in wax or plaster, for use in preparing crowns, inlays, or dentures
8.
an imitation or impersonation: he did a funny impression of the politician
n.

late 14c., “mark produced by pressure,” also “image produced in the mind or emotions,” from Old French impression “print, stamp; a pressing on the mind,” from Latin impressionem (nominative impressio) “onset, attack,” figuratively “perception,” literally “a pressing into,” from imprimere (see impress). Meaning “act or process of indenting” is early 15c.; that of “printing of a number of copies” is from 1570s. Meaning “belief, vague notion” (as in under the impression) is from 1610s.

impression im·pres·sion (ĭm-prěsh’ən)
n.

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