Induction



the act of inducing, bringing about, or causing:
induction of the hypnotic state.
the act of inducting; introduction; initiation.
formal installation in an office, benefice, or the like.
Logic.

any form of reasoning in which the conclusion, though supported by the premises, does not follow from them necessarily.
the process of estimating the validity of observations of part of a class of facts as evidence for a proposition about the whole class.
a conclusion reached by this process.

Also called mathematical induction. Mathematics. a method of proving a given property true for a set of numbers by proving it true for 1 and then true for an arbitrary positive integer by assuming the property true for all previous positive integers and applying the principle of mathematical induction.
a presentation or bringing forward, as of facts or evidence.
Electricity, Magnetism. the process by which a body having electric or magnetic properties produces magnetism, an electric charge, or an electromotive force in a neighboring body without contact.
Compare , .
Embryology. the process or principle by which one part of the embryo influences the differentiation of another part.
Biochemistry. the synthesis of an enzyme in response to an increased concentration of its substrate in the cell.
an introductory unit in literary work, especially in an early play; prelude or scene independent of the main performance but related to it.
Archaic. a preface.
Contemporary Examples

On April 14, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame held their 27th annual induction Ceremony.
Slash Talks Guns N’ Roses’ Future, New Album ‘Apocalyptic Love,’ and More Marlow Stern May 24, 2012

Upon release, I had to report to the induction center again, and, after refusing once more, I received another month behind bars.
My Story As a Pacifist in Israel Jonathan Ben-Artzi August 15, 2012

induction would be a fitting gesture, even now when the honor would be posthumous.
The Greatest Rock Voice of All Time Belonged to Joe Cocker Ted Gioia December 22, 2014

I was immediately admitted to the hospital and induction was started for me to go into labor.
Daily Beast Readers React to YouTube Stillborn Baby Memorials Brandy Zadrozny November 11, 2013

All sciences face the “problem of induction” or uncertainties that arise in generalizing from observations.
David’s Book Club: Uncontrolled Kenneth Silber May 11, 2012

Historical Examples

But this was not the worst defect of Mill’s attempt at a junction of old and new through Whately’s conception of induction.
Logic, Inductive and Deductive William Minto

She punishes abstractionists, and will only forgive an induction which is rare and casual.
Essays, Second Series Ralph Waldo Emerson

Explain the process of induction called the Method of Difference, and give some new instances of its application.
Logic Carveth Read

The rules of induction are general, but they depend on the subjects to which they are applied.
India: What can it teach us? F. Max Mller

This is proved by induction; but the proposition has not been demonstrated as regards universal Being.
Plotinos: Complete Works, v. 4 Plotinos (Plotinus)

noun
the act of inducting or state of being inducted
the act of inducing
(in an internal-combustion engine) the part of the action of a piston by which mixed air and fuel are drawn from the carburettor to the cylinder
(logic)

a process of reasoning, used esp in science, by which a general conclusion is drawn from a set of premises, based mainly on experience or experimental evidence. The conclusion goes beyond the information contained in the premises, and does not follow necessarily from them. Thus an inductive argument may be highly probable, yet lead from true premises to a false conclusion
a conclusion reached by this process of reasoning Compare deduction (sense 4)

the process by which electrical or magnetic properties are transferred, without physical contact, from one circuit or body to another See also inductance
(biology) the effect of one tissue, esp an embryonic tissue, on the development of an adjacent tissue
(biochem) the process by which synthesis of an enzyme is stimulated by the presence of its substrate
(maths, logic)

a method of proving a proposition that all integers have a property, by first proving that 1 has the property and then that if the integer n has it so has n + 1
the application of recursive rules

a formal introduction or entry into an office or position
(as modifier): induction course, induction period

(US) the formal enlistment of a civilian into military service
an archaic word for preface
n.

late 14c., “advancement toward the grace of God;” also (c.1400) “formal installation of a clergyman,” from Old French induction (14c.) or directly from Latin inductionem (nominative inductio) “a leading in, introduction,” noun of action from past participle stem of inducere “to lead” (see induce).

As a term in logic (early 15c.) it is from Cicero’s use of inductio to translate Greek epagoge “leading to” in Aristotle. Induction starts with known instances and arrives at generalizations; deduction starts from the general principle and arrives at some individual fact. As a term of science, c.1800; military service sense is from 1934, American English.

induction in·duc·tion (ĭn-dŭk’shən)
n.

The process of initiating or increasing the production of an enzyme or other protein at the level of genetic transcription.

The period from the first administration of anesthesia to the establishment of a depth of anesthesia adequate for surgery.

The change in form or shape caused by the action of one tissue of an embryo on adjacent tissues or parts, as by the diffusion of hormones.

A modification imposed upon the offspring by the action of environment on the germ cells of one or both parents.

The generation of electromotive force in a closed circuit by a varying magnetic flux through the circuit.

induction
(ĭn-dŭk’shən)

The process of deriving general principles from particular facts or instances.

A conclusion reached by this process. See Note at deduction.

The creation of a voltage difference across a conductive material (such as a coil of wire) by exposing it to a changing magnetic field. Induction is fundamental to hydroelectric power, in which water-powered turbines spin wire coils through strong magnetic fields. It is also the working principle underlying transformers and induction coils.

The generation of an electric current in a conductor, such as a copper wire, by exposing it to the electric field of an electrically charged conductor.

The building up of a net electric charge on a conductive material by separating its charge to create two oppositely charged regions, then bleeding off the charge from one region.

The creation of a voltage difference across a conductive material (such as a coil of wire) by exposing it to a changing magnetic field. Induction is fundamental to hydroelectric power, in which water-powered turbines spin wire coils through strong magnetic fields. It is also the working principle underlying transformers and induction coils.

The generation of an electric current in a conductor, such as a copper wire, by exposing it to the electric field of an electrically charged conductor.

The building up of a net electric charge on a conductive material by separating its charge to create two oppositely charged regions, then bleeding off the charge from one region.

A process of reasoning that moves from specific instances to predict general principles. (Compare deduction.)

An effect in electrical systems in which electrical currents store energy temporarily in magnetic fields before that energy is returned to the circuit.
logic
A method of proving statements about well-ordered sets. If S is a well-ordered set with ordering “IF for all t in S, t P(t) THEN P(s)
I.e. if P holds for anything less than s then it holds for s. In this case we say P is proved by induction.
The most common instance of proof by induction is induction over the natural numbers where we prove that some property holds for n=0 and that if it holds for n, it holds for n+1.
(In fact it is sufficient for “well-founded partial order on S, not necessarily a well-ordering of S.)
(1999-12-09)

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