Jackson



[jak-suh n] /ˈdʒæk sən/

noun
1.
Andrew (“Old Hickory”) 1767–1845, U.S. general: 7th president of the U.S. 1829–37.
2.
Lady Barbara, .
3.
Helen Hunt (Helen Maria Fiske) 1830–85, U.S. novelist and poet.
4.
Jesse L(ouis) born 1941, U.S. Baptist minister and civil-rights and political activist.
5.
Joseph Jefferson (“Shoeless Joe”) 1887–1951, U.S. baseball player.
6.
Mahalia, 1911–72, U.S. gospel singer.
7.
Robert Houghwout
[hou-uh t] /ˈhaʊ ət/ (Show IPA), 1892–1954, U.S. jurist: associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court 1941–54.
8.
Thomas Jonathan (“Stonewall Jackson”) 1824–63, Confederate general in the American Civil War.
9.
a city in and the capital of Mississippi, in the central part.
10.
a city in W Tennessee.
11.
a city in S Michigan.
12.
a town in NW Wyoming: resort near .
13.
a male given name, meaning “son of Jack.”.
[mis-uh-sip-ee] /ˌmɪs əˈsɪp i/
noun
1.
a state in the S United States. 47,716 sq. mi. (123,585 sq. km).
Capital: Jackson.
Abbreviation: MS (for use with zip code), Miss.
2.
a river flowing S from N Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico: the principal river of the U.S. 2470 miles (3975 km) long; from the headwaters of the Missouri to the Gulf of Mexico 3988 miles (6418 km) long.
/ˈdʒæksən/
noun
1.
a city in and state capital of Mississippi, on the Pearl River. Pop: 179 599 (2003 est)
/ˈdʒæksən/
noun
1.
Andrew. 1767–1845, US statesman, general, and lawyer; seventh president of the US (1829–37). He became a national hero after successfully defending New Orleans from the British (1815). During his administration the spoils system was introduced and the national debt was fully paid off
2.
Colin (Ray). born 1967, Welsh athlete: gold medallist in the 110m hurdles at the world championships (1993, 1999), European Championships (1990, 1994, 1998, 2002), and Commonwealth Games (1990, 1994)
3.
Glenda. born 1936, British stage, film, and television actress, and Labour politician. Her films include Women in Love (1969) for which she won an Oscar, The Music Lovers (1970), Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971), and Turtle Diary (1985); became a member of parliament in 1992
4.
Jesse (Louis). born 1941, US Democrat politician and clergyman; Black campaigner for minority rights
5.
Michael (Joe). 1958–2009, US pop singer, lead vocalist with the Jacksons (originally the Jackson 5) (1969–86). His solo albums include Thriller (1982), Bad (1987), and Invincible (2001)
6.
Peter. born 1961, New Zealand film director, screenwriter, and producer; his films include Heavenly Creatures (1994), The Lord of the Rings trilogy (2001–03), King Kong (2005), and The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012)
7.
Thomas Jonathan, known as Stonewall Jackson. 1824–63, Confederate general in the American Civil War, noted particularly for his command at the first Battle of Bull Run (1861)
/ˌmɪsɪˈsɪpɪ/
noun
1.
a state of the southeastern US, on the Gulf of Mexico: consists of a largely forested undulating plain, with swampy regions in the northwest and on the coast, the Mississippi River forming the W border; cotton, rice, and oil. Capital: Jackson. Pop: 2 881 281 (2003 est). Area: 122 496 sq km (47 296 sq miles) Abbreviation Miss, (with zip code) MS
2.
a river in the central US, rising in NW Minnesota and flowing generally south to the Gulf of Mexico through several mouths, known as the Passes: the second longest river in North America (after its tributary, the Missouri), with the third largest drainage basin in the world (after the Amazon and the Congo). Length: 3780 km (2348 miles)

originally as the name of the river, from French, from Algonquian (French missionaries first penetrated the river valley in its upper reaches), literally “big river;” cf. Ojibwa mshi- “big,” ziibi “river.” Organized as a U.S. territory 1798; admitted as a state 1817. Related: Mississippian.

Jackson Jack·son (jāk’sən), John Hughlings. 1835-1911.

British neurologist whose connection of certain epileptic symptoms to specific locations in the brain advanced the understanding of epilepsy.

State in the southern United States bordered by Tennessee to the north, Alabama to the east, the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana to the south, and Louisiana and Arkansas to the west. Its capital and largest city is Jackson.

Note: Its name comes from the Mississippi River, which forms most of the state’s western border.

Note: One of the Confederate states during the Civil War.

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  • Jackson-day

    noun 1. January 8, a holiday commemorating Andrew Jackson’s victory at the Battle of New Orleans in 1815: a legal holiday in Louisiana.

  • Jackson-hole

    noun 1. a valley in NW Wyoming, near the Teton Range: wildlife preserve.



  • Jacksonian

    [jak-soh-nee-uh n] /dʒækˈsoʊ ni ən/ adjective 1. of or relating to Andrew , his ideas, the period of his presidency, or the political principles or social values associated with him: Jacksonian democracy. noun 2. a follower of Andrew . /dʒækˈsəʊnɪən/ adjective 1. of or relating to a person surnamed Jackson, esp Andrew Jackson 1824, of […]

  • Jacksonian democracy

    Jacksonian democracy [(jak-soh-nee-uhn)] A movement for more democracy in American government in the 1830s. Led by President Andrew Jackson, this movement championed greater rights for the common man and was opposed to any signs of aristocracy in the nation. Jacksonian democracy was aided by the strong spirit of equality among the people of the newer […]



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