Hugo Lafayette, 1886–1971, U.S. political official: associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court 1937–71.
(Sir) James Whyte [hwahyt,, wahyt] /ʰwaɪt,, waɪt/ (Show IPA), born 1924, English pharmacologist: Nobel prize 1988.
Joseph, 1728–99, Scottish physician and chemist.
Shirley Temple, Temple, Shirley.
of the colour of jet or carbon black, having no hue due to the absorption of all or nearly all incident light Compare white (sense 1)
without light; completely dark
without hope or alleviation; gloomy: the future looked black
very dirty or soiled: black factory chimneys
angry or resentful: she gave him black looks
(of a play or other work) dealing with the unpleasant realities of life, esp in a pessimistic or macabre manner: black comedy
(of coffee or tea) without milk or cream
causing, resulting from, or showing great misfortune: black areas of unemployment

wicked or harmful: a black lie
(in combination): black-hearted

causing or deserving dishonour or censure: a black crime
(of the face) purple, as from suffocation
(Brit) (of goods, jobs, works, etc) being subject to boycott by trade unionists, esp in support of industrial action elsewhere
a black colour
a dye or pigment of or producing this colour
black clothing, worn esp as a sign of mourning
(chess, draughts)

a black or dark-coloured piece or square
(usually capital) the player playing with such pieces

complete darkness: the black of the night
a black ball in snooker, etc
(in roulette and other gambling games) one of two colours on which players may place even bets, the other being red
in the black, in credit or without debt
(archery) a black ring on a target, between the outer and the blue, scoring three points
another word for blacken
(transitive) to polish (shoes, etc) with blacking
(transitive) to bruise so as to make black: he blacked her eye
(transitive) (Brit & Austral, NZ) (of trade unionists) to organize a boycott of (specified goods, jobs, work, etc), esp in support of industrial action elsewhere
a member of a human population having dark pigmentation of the skin
of or relating to a Black person or Black people: a Black neighbourhood
Sir James (Whyte). 1924–2010, British biochemist. He discovered beta-blockers and drugs for peptic ulcers: Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1988
Joseph. 1728–99, Scottish physician and chemist, noted for his pioneering work on carbon dioxide and heat

For years it has been a common practice to use red ink instead of black in showing a loss or deficit on corporate books, but not until the heavy losses of 1921 did the contrast in colors come to have a widely understood meaning. [“Saturday Evening Post,” July 22, 1922]

British pharmacologist who discovered the first beta-blocker, which led to the development of safer and more effective drugs to treat high blood pressure and heart disease. Black also developed a blocker for gastric acid production that revolutionized the treatment of stomach ulcers. He shared with Gertrude Elion and George Hitchings the 1988 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine.

Secret: The plans for the Stealth bomber were kept in the military’s black budget (1960s+)
Of coffee, without cream or milk

black and blue
black and white
black as night
black book
black eye
Black Friday
black hole
black list
black look
black mark
black out
black sheep


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