Judy



[joo-dee] /ˈdʒu di/

noun
1.
the wife of Punch in the puppet show called Punch and Judy.
2.
Also, Judie. a female given name, form of .
[hol-i-dey] /ˈhɒl ɪˌdeɪ/
noun
1.
Judith Tuvim (“Judy”) 1921–65, U.S. comic actress.
[jon-suh n; for 5 also Swedish yoo n-sawn] /ˈdʒɒn sən; for 5 also Swedish ˈyʊn sɔn/
noun
1.
Andrew, 1808–75, seventeenth president of the U.S. 1865–69.
2.
Charles Spurgeon
[spur-juh n] /ˈspɜr dʒən/ (Show IPA), 1893–1956, U.S. educator and sociologist.
3.
Claudia Alta Taylor (“Lady Bird”) 1912–2007, U.S. First Lady 1963–69 (wife of Lyndon Johnson).
4.
(Earvin) Magic, Jr, born 1959, U.S. basketball player.
5.
Eyvind
[ey-vin] /ˈeɪ vɪn/ (Show IPA), 1900–76, Swedish writer: Nobel prize 1974.
6.
Gerald White, 1890–1980, U.S. writer.
7.
Howard (Deering)
[deer-ing] /ˈdɪər ɪŋ/ (Show IPA), 1896?–1972, U.S. businessman: founder of restaurant and motel chain.
8.
Jack (John Arthur) 1878–1946, U.S. heavyweight prizefighter: world champion 1908–15.
9.
James Price, 1891–1955, U.S. pianist and jazz composer.
10.
James Weldon
[wel-duh n] /ˈwɛl dən/ (Show IPA), 1871–1938, U.S. poet and essayist.
11.
Lyndon Baines
[lin-duh n beynz] /ˈlɪn dən beɪnz/ (Show IPA), 1908–73, thirty-sixth president of the U.S. 1963–69.
12.
Michael, born 1967, U.S. track athlete.
13.
Philip C(ortelyou) 1906–2005, U.S. architect and author.
14.
Reverdy
[rev-er-dee] /ˈrɛv ər di/ (Show IPA), 1796–1876, U.S. lawyer and politician: senator 1845–49, 1863–68.
15.
Richard Mentor
[men-ter,, -tawr] /ˈmɛn tər,, -tɔr/ (Show IPA), 1780–1850, vice president of the U.S. 1837–41.
16.
Robert, 1911–38, U.S. blues singer and guitarist from the Mississippi Delta.
17.
Samuel (“Dr. Johnson”) 1709–84, English lexicographer, critic, poet, and conversationalist.
18.
Thomas, 1732–1819, U.S. politician and Supreme Court justice 1791–93.
19.
Virginia E(shelman)
[esh-uh l-muh n] /ˈɛʃ əl mən/ (Show IPA), 1925–2013, U.S. psychologist: researcher on human sexual behavior (wife of William H. Masters).
20.
Walter Perry (“Big Train”) 1887–1946, U.S. baseball player.
21.
Sir William, 1715–74, British colonial administrator in America, born in Ireland.
22.
William Julius (“Judy”) 1899–1989, U.S. baseball player, Negro Leagues star.
/ˈdʒuːdɪ/
noun (pl) -dies
1.
the wife of Punch in the children’s puppet show Punch and Judy See Punch
2.
(often not capital) (Brit, slang) a girl or woman
/ˈdʒɒnsən/
noun
1.
Amy 1903–41, British aviator, who made several record flights, including those to Australia (1930) and to Cape Town and back (1936)
2.
Andrew 1808–75, US Democrat statesman who was elected vice president under the Republican Abraham Lincoln; 17th president of the US (1865–69), became president after Lincoln’s assassination. His lenience towards the South after the American Civil War led to strong opposition from radical Republicans, who tried to impeach him
3.
Earvin (ˈɜːvɪn), known as Magic. born 1959, US basketball player
4.
Eyvind (ˈevɪnt). 1900–76, Swedish novelist and writer, whose novels include the Krilon trilogy (1941–43): joint winner of the Nobel prize for literature 1974
5.
Jack 1878–1946, US boxer; world heavyweight champion (1908–15)
6.
Lionel (Pigot) 1867–1902, British poet and critic, best known for his poems “Dark Angel” and “By the Statue of King Charles at Charing Cross”
7.
Lyndon Baines known as LBJ. 1908–73, US Democrat statesman; 36th president of the US (1963–69). His administration carried the Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and 1965, but he lost popularity by increasing US involvement in the Vietnam war
8.
Martin. born 1970, English Rugby Union footballer; captain of the England team that won the World Cup in 2003.
9.
Michael (Duane) born 1967, US athlete: world (1995) and Olympic (1996) 200- and 400-metre gold medallist
10.
Philip (Cortelyou). 1906–2005, US architect and writer; his buildings include the New York State Theater (1964) and the American Telephone and Telegraph building (1978–83), both in New York
11.
Robert ?1898–1937, US blues singer and guitarist
12.
Samuel known as Dr. Johnson. 1709–84, British lexicographer, critic, and conversationalist, whose greatest works are his Dictionary (1755), his edition of Shakespeare (1765), and his Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets (1779–81). His fame, however, rests as much on Boswell’s biography of him as on his literary output

pet form of Judith. Figurative uses often are from the Punch and Judy puppet show.
n.

“penis,” 1863, perhaps related to British slang John Thomas, which has the same meaning (1887).

noun

sentence

I have you in sight or on the radar screen

[WWII Air Forces; origin unknown]

noun

Credit or trust, esp financial: Try as he might he got no jawbone from the bankers (1862+)

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