Katharine brush



[bruhsh] /brʌʃ/

noun
1.
Katharine, 1902–52, U.S. novelist and short-story writer.
/brʌʃ/
noun
1.
a device made of bristles, hairs, wires, etc, set into a firm back or handle: used to apply paint, clean or polish surfaces, groom the hair, etc
2.
the act or an instance of brushing
3.
a light stroke made in passing; graze
4.
a brief encounter or contact, esp an unfriendly one; skirmish
5.
the bushy tail of a fox, often kept as a trophy after a hunt, or of certain breeds of dog
6.
an electric conductor, esp one made of carbon, that conveys current between stationary and rotating parts of a generator, motor, etc
7.
a dark brush-shaped region observed when a biaxial crystal is viewed through a microscope, caused by interference between beams of polarized light
verb
8.
(transitive) to clean, polish, scrub, paint, etc, with a brush
9.
(transitive) to apply or remove with a brush or brushing movement: brush the crumbs off the table
10.
(transitive) to touch lightly and briefly
11.
(intransitive) to move so as to graze or touch something lightly
/brʌʃ/
noun
1.
a thick growth of shrubs and small trees; scrub
2.
land covered with scrub
3.
broken or cut branches or twigs; brushwood
4.
wooded sparsely populated country; backwoods
n.

“dust-sweeper, a brush for sweeping,” late 14c., also, c.1400, “brushwood, brushes;” from Old French broisse (Modern French brosse) “a brush” (13c.), perhaps from Vulgar Latin *bruscia “a bunch of new shoots” (used to sweep away dust), perhaps from Proto-Germanic *bruskaz “underbrush.”

“shrubbery,” early 14c., from Anglo-French bruce “brushwood,” Old North French broche, Old French broce “bush, thicket, undergrowth” (12c., Modern French brosse), from Gallo-Romance *brocia, perhaps from *brucus “heather,” or possibly from the same source as brush (n.1).
v.

late 15c., “to clean or rub (clothing) with a brush,” also (mid-15c.) “to beat with a brush,” from brush (n.1). Related: Brushed; brushing. To brush off someone or something, “rebuff, dismiss,” is from 1941.

“move briskly” especially past or against something or someone, 1670s, from earlier sense (c.1400) “to hasten, rush,” probably from brush (n.2), on the notion of a horse, etc., passing through dense undergrowth (cf. Old French brosser “travel (through woods),” and Middle English noun brush “charge, onslaught, encounter,” mid-14c.), but brush (n.1) probably has contributed something to it as well. Related: Brushed; brushing.

noun

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