Legging



[leg-ing] /ˈlɛg ɪŋ/

noun
1.
a covering for the leg, usually extending from the ankle to the knee but sometimes higher, worn by soldiers, riders, workers, etc.
Compare , , .
2.
leggings, (used with a plural verb)

[leg] /lɛg/
noun
1.
either of the two lower limbs of a biped, as a human being, or any of the paired limbs of an animal, arthropod, etc., that support and move the body.
2.
Anatomy. the lower limb of a human being from the knee to the ankle.
3.
something resembling or suggesting a leg in use, position, or appearance.
4.
the part of a garment that covers the leg:
the leg of a stocking; trouser leg.
5.
one of usually several, relatively tall, slender supports for a piece of furniture.
6.
one of the sides of a forked object, as of a compass or pair of dividers.
7.
one of the sides of a triangle other than the base or hypotenuse.
8.
a timber, bar, or the like, serving to prop or shore up a structure.
9.
one of the flanges of an angle iron.
10.
one of the distinct sections of any course:
the last leg of a trip.
11.
Nautical.

12.
Sports.

13.
legs, (in wine tasting) the rivulets of wine that slowly descend along the inside of a glass after the wine has been swirled, sometimes regarded as an indication that the wine is full-bodied.
14.
Cricket.

15.
Electricity. a component or branch of a circuit, network, antenna, etc.
16.
Radio and Television. a connecting link between stations in a network, as the microwave relays used in transmitting a show from one geographical area to another.
17.
2 (def 1).
verb (used with object), legged, legging.
18.
to move or propel (a boat) with the legs:
They legged the boat through the tunnel.
Verb phrases
19.
leg up, to help (someone) to mount a horse.
Idioms
20.
leg it, Informal. to walk rapidly or run:
We’d better leg it or we’ll be late for class.
21.
leg up,

22.
not have a leg to stand on, to lack a valid or logical basis for one’s argument or attitude:
Without evidence, the prosecutor doesn’t have a leg to stand on.
23.
on one’s / its last legs, just short of exhaustion, breakdown, failure, etc.:
The aristocracy was on its last legs.
24.
pull someone’s leg,

25.
shake a leg, Informal.

26.
stretch one’s legs, to take a walk; get some needed exercise after prolonged sitting:
He got up during the intermission to stretch his legs.
/lɛɡ/
noun
1.

2.
any similar or analogous structure in animals that is used for locomotion or support
3.
this part of an animal, esp the thigh, used for food: leg of lamb
4.
something similar to a leg in appearance or function, such as one of the four supporting members of a chair
5.
a branch, limb, or part of a forked or jointed object
6.
the part of a garment that covers the leg
7.
a section or part of a journey or course
8.
a single stage, lap, length, etc, in a relay race
9.
either one of two races on which a cumulative bet has been placed
10.
either the opposite or adjacent side of a right-angled triangle
11.
(nautical)

12.
one of a series of games, matches, or parts of games
13.
(cricket)

14.
give someone a leg up

15.
(informal) have legs, to be successful or show the potential to succeed
16.
not have a leg to stand on, to have no reasonable or logical basis for an opinion or argument
17.
on its last legs, worn out; exhausted
18.
(informal) pull someone’s leg, to tease, fool, or make fun of someone
19.
(informal) shake a leg

20.
(informal) show a leg, to get up in the morning
21.
stretch one’s legs, See stretch (sense 17)
verb legs, legging, legged
22.
(transitive) (obsolete) to propel (a canal boat) through a tunnel by lying on one’s back and walking one’s feet along the tunnel roof
23.
(informal) leg it, to walk, run, or hurry
n.

“extra outer covering to protect the leg,” 1763, from leg (n.). Related: Leggings.
n.

late 13c., from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse leggr “leg, bone of the arm or leg,” from Proto-Germanic *lagjaz, with no certain ulterior connections, perhaps from a PIE root meaning “to bend” [Buck]. Cf. German Bein “leg,” in Old High German “bone, leg.” Replaced Old English shank. Of furniture supports from 1670s. The meaning “a part or stage of a journey or race” (1920) is from earlier sailing sense of “a run made on a single tack” (1867), which was usually qualified as long leg, short leg, etc. Slang phrase shake a leg “dance” is attested from 1881. To be on (one’s) last legs “at the end of one’s life” is from 1590s.
v.

“to use the legs; walk or run,” c.1500 (from the beginning usually with it); from leg (n.).

leg (lěg)
n.

noun

verb

(also leg it) To go; travel: I was legging down the line (1601+)

Related Terms

an arm and a leg, bootleg, give someone leg, have a leg up on someone or something, peg leg, pull someone’s leg, shake a leg, shake a wicked calf, tangle-foot
In addition to the idiom beginning with
leg

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    [leg-ing] /ˈlɛg ɪŋ/ noun 1. a covering for the leg, usually extending from the ankle to the knee but sometimes higher, worn by soldiers, riders, workers, etc. Compare , , . 2. leggings, (used with a plural verb) /ˈlɛɡɪŋz/ plural noun 1. an extra outer covering for the lower legs 2. close-fitting trousers worn by […]

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