Linch



n.

early 14c., lins, from Old English lynis “linchpin,” from Proto-Germanic *luniso (cf. Old Saxon lunisa, Middle Dutch lunse, Dutch luns, German Lünse).

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  • Linchpin

    [linch-pin] /ˈlɪntʃˌpɪn/ noun 1. a pin inserted through the end of an axletree to keep the wheel on. 2. something that holds the various elements of a complicated structure together: The monarchy was the linchpin of the nation’s traditions and society. /ˈlɪntʃˌpɪn/ noun 1. a pin placed transversely through an axle to keep a wheel […]

  • Lincoln

    [ling-kuh n] /ˈlɪŋ kən/ noun 1. Abbey (Anna Marie Gaby Wooldridge; Aminata Moseka) born 1930, U.S. jazz singer, activist, and actress. 2. Abraham (“Abe”; “Honest Abe”) 1809–65, 16th president of the U.S. 1861–65. 3. Benjamin, 1733–1810, American Revolutionary general. 4. Mary Todd, 1818–82, U.S. First Lady 1861–65 (wife of Abraham Lincoln). 5. a city in […]



  • Lincoln center

    noun 1. a centre for the performing arts in New York City, including theatres, a library, and a school Official name Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts

  • Lincoln-douglas debates

    A series of debates between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas in 1858, when both were campaigning for election to the United States Senate from Illinois. Much of the debating concerned slavery and its extension into territories such as Kansas. The debates transformed Lincoln into a national figure and led to his election to the […]



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