List



[list] /lɪst/

noun
1.
a series of names or other items written or printed together in a meaningful grouping or sequence so as to constitute a record:
a list of members.
2.
.
3.
Computers. a series of records in a file.
4.
a complete record of stocks handled by a stock exchange.
5.
all of the books of a publisher that are available for sale.
6.
Digital Technology. :
Please unsubscribe me from the list.
verb (used with object)
7.
to set down together in a list; make a list of:
to list the membership of a club.
8.
to enter in a list, directory, catalog, etc.:
to list him among the members.
9.
to place on a list of persons to be watched, excluded, restricted, etc.
10.
Computers. to print or display in a list:
Let’s list the whole program and see where the bug is.
11.
to register (a security) on a stock exchange so that it may be traded there.
12.
Archaic. .
verb (used without object)
13.
to be offered for sale, as in a catalog, at a specified price:
This radio lists at $49.95.
14.
Archaic. enlist.
[list] /lɪst/
noun
1.
a border or bordering strip, usually of cloth.
2.
a selvage.
3.
selvages collectively.
4.
a strip of cloth or other material.
5.
a strip or band of any kind.
6.
a stripe of color.
7.
a division of the hair or beard.
8.
one of the ridges or furrows of earth made by a .
9.
a strip of material, as bark or sapwood, to be trimmed from a board.
10.
(def 6a).
adjective
11.
made of selvages or strips of cloth.
verb (used with object)
12.
to produce furrows and ridges on (land) with a lister.
13.
to prepare (ground) for planting by making ridges and furrows.
14.
to cut away a narrow strip of wood from the edge of (a stave, plank, etc.).
15.
Obsolete. to apply a border or edge to.
[list] /lɪst/
noun
1.
a careening, or leaning to one side, as of a ship.
verb (used without object)
2.
(of a ship or boat) to incline to one side; careen:
The ship listed to starboard.
verb (used with object)
3.
to cause (a vessel) to incline to one side:
The shifting of the cargo listed the ship to starboard.
[list] /lɪst/ Archaic.
verb (used with object)
1.
to please.
2.
to like or desire.
verb (used without object)
3.
to like; wish; choose.
[list] /lɪst/ Archaic.
verb (used without object)
1.
to .
verb (used with object)
2.
to listen to.
[list] /lɪst/
noun
1.
Friedrich
[free-drik] /ˈfri drɪk/ (Show IPA), 1789–1846, U.S. political economist and journalist, born in Germany.
/lɪst/
noun
1.
an item-by-item record of names or things, usually written or printed one under the other
2.
(computing) a linearly ordered data structure
3.
be on the danger list, to be in a critical medical or physical condition
verb
4.
(transitive) to make a list of
5.
(transitive) to include in a list
6.
(transitive) (Brit) to declare to be a listed building
7.
(transitive) (stock exchange) to obtain an official quotation for (a security) so that it may be traded on the recognized market
8.
an archaic word for enlist
/lɪst/
verb
1.
(esp of ships) to lean over or cause to lean over to one side
noun
2.
the act or an instance of leaning to one side
/lɪst/
noun
1.
a border or edging strip, esp of cloth
2.
a less common word for selvage
3.
a strip of bark, sapwood, etc, trimmed from a board or plank
4.
another word for fillet (sense 8)
5.
a strip, band, ridge or furrow
6.
(agriculture) a ridge in ploughed land formed by throwing two furrows together
verb (transitive)
7.
to border with or as if with a list or lists
8.
(agriculture) to plough (land) so as to form lists
9.
to cut a list from (a board, plank, etc)
/lɪst/
verb
1.
to be pleasing to (a person)
2.
(transitive) to desire or choose
noun
3.
a liking or desire
/lɪst/
verb
1.
an archaic or poetic word for listen
n.

“catalogue consisting of names in a row or series,” c.1600, from Middle English liste “border, edging, stripe” (late 13c.), from Old French liste “border, band, row, group,” also “strip of paper,” or from Old Italian lista “border, strip of paper, list,” both from a Germanic source (cf. Old High German lista “strip, border, list,” Old Norse lista “border, selvage,” Old English liste “border”), from Proto-Germanic *liston, from PIE *leizd- “border, band.” The sense of “enumeration” is from strips of paper used as a sort of catalogue.

“a narrow strip,” Old English liste “border, hem, edge, strip,” from Proto-Germanic *liston (cf. Old High German lista “strip, border, list,” Old Norse lista “border, selvage,”German leiste), from PIE *leizd- “border, band” (see list (n.1)). The Germanic root also is the source of French liste, Italian lista. This was the source of archaic lists “place of combat,” originally at the boundary of fields.
v.

“tilt, lean,” especially of a ship, 1880, earlier (1620s) lust, of unknown origin, perhaps an unexplained spelling variant of Middle English lysten “to please, desire, wish, like” (see list (v.4)) with a sense development from the notion of “leaning” toward what one desires (cf. incline). Related: Listed; listing. The noun in this sense is from 1630s.

“hear, hearken,” now poetic or obsolete, from Old English hlystan “hear, hearken,” from hlyst “hearing,” from Proto-Germanic *khlustiz, from PIE *kleu- “to hear” (see listen). Related: Listed; listing.

“to put down in a list; to make a list of,” 1610s, from list (n.1). Meaning “to place real estate on the market” is from 1904. Attested from c.1300 as “put an edge around,” from list (n.2). Related: Listed; listing.

“to be pleased, desire” (archaic), mid-12c., lusten, listen “to please, desire,” from Old English lystan “to please, cause pleasure or desire, provoke longing,” from Proto-Germanic *lustijan (cf. Old Saxon lustian, Dutch lusten “to like, fancy,” Old High German lusten, German lüsten, Old Norse lysta); from the root of lust (n.). Related: Listed; listing. As a noun, c.1200, from the verb. Somehow English has lost listy (adj.) “pleasant, willing (to do something); ready, quick” (mid-15c.).

Related Terms

hit list, shit list, sucker list, wish list

data
A data structure holding many values, possibly of different types, which is usually accessed sequentially, working from the head to the end of the tail – an “ordered list”. This contrasts with a (one-dimensional) array, any element of which can be accessed equally quickly.
Lists are often stored using a cell and pointer arrangement where each value is stored in a cell along with an associated pointer to the next cell. A special pointer, e.g. zero, marks the end of the list. This is known as a (singly) “linked list”. A doubly linked list has pointers from each cell to both next and previous cells.
An unordered list is a set.
(1998-11-12)
see:

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  • Listed

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