Live



[liv] /lɪv/

verb (used without object), lived
[livd] /lɪvd/ (Show IPA), living.
1.
to have , as an organism; be alive; be capable of vital functions:
all things that live.
2.
to continue to have life; remain alive:
to live to a ripe old age.
3.
to continue in existence, operation, memory, etc.; last:
a book that lives in my memory.
4.
to maintain or support one’s existence; provide for oneself:
to live on one’s income.
5.
to feed or subsist (usually followed by on or upon):
to live on rice and bananas.
6.
to dwell or reside (usually followed by in, at, etc.):
to live in a cottage.
7.
to pass life in a specified manner:
They lived happily ever after.
8.
to direct or regulate one’s life:
to live by the golden rule.
9.
to experience or enjoy to the full:
At 40 she was just beginning to live.
10.
to cohabit (usually followed by with).
11.
to escape destruction or remain afloat, as a ship or aircraft.
verb (used with object), lived
[livd] /lɪvd/ (Show IPA), living.
12.
to pass (life):
to live a life of ease.
13.
to practice, represent, or exhibit in one’s :
to live one’s philosophy.
Verb phrases
14.
live down, to live so as to allow (a mistake, disgrace, etc.) to be forgotten or forgiven:
She’ll never live that crucial moment of failure down.
15.
live in/out, to reside at or away from the place of one’s employment, especially as a domestic servant:
Their butler lives in, but the maids live out.
16.
live up to, to live in accordance with (expectations or an ideal or standard); measure up to:
He never lived up to his father’s vision of him.
Idioms
17.
live high off / on the hog. (def 16).
18.
live it up, Informal. to live in an extravagant or wild manner; pursue pleasure:
He started living it up after he got out of the army.
19.
live well, to live comfortably:
They’re not wealthy but they live well.
[lahyv] /laɪv/
adjective, liver, livest for 4–7, 13–15.
1.
being alive; living; alive:
live animals.
2.
of, relating to, or during the of a living being:
the animal’s live weight.
3.
characterized by or indicating the presence of living creatures:
the live sounds of the forest.
4.
Informal. (of a person) energetic; alert; :
The club members are a really live bunch.
5.
full of life, energy or activity:
His approach in any business dealing is live and fresh.
6.
burning or glowing:
live coals in the fireplace.
7.
having resilience or bounce:
a live tennis ball.
8.
being in play, as a baseball or football.
9.
loaded or unexploded, as a cartridge or shell:
live ammunition.
10.
made up of actual persons:
to perform before a live audience.
11.
(of a radio or television program) broadcast while happening or being performed; not prerecorded or taped:
a live telecast.
12.
being highly resonant or reverberant, as an auditorium or concert hall.
13.
vivid or bright, as color.
14.
of current interest or importance, as a question or issue; controversial; unsettled.
15.
moving or imparting motion; powered:
the live head on a lathe.
16.
still in use, or to be used, as type set up or copy for printing.
17.
Also, alive. Electricity. electrically connected to a source of potential difference, or electrically charged so as to have a potential different from that of earth:
a live wire.
adverb
18.
(of a radio or television program) at the moment of its happening or being performed; not on tape or by prerecording:
a program broadcast live.
Idioms
19.
live one, Slang.

/lɪv/
verb (mainly intransitive)
1.
to show the characteristics of life; be alive
2.
to remain alive or in existence
3.
to exist in a specified way: to live poorly
4.
usually foll by in or at. to reside or dwell: to live in London
5.
(often foll by on) to continue or last: the pain still lives in her memory
6.
(usually foll by by) to order one’s life (according to a certain philosophy, religion, etc)
7.
foll by on, upon, or by. to support one’s style of life; subsist: to live by writing
8.
(foll by with) to endure the effects (of a crime, mistake, etc)
9.
(foll by through) to experience and survive: he lived through the war
10.
(transitive) to pass or spend (one’s life, etc)
11.
to enjoy life to the full: he knows how to live
12.
(transitive) to put into practice in one’s daily life; express: he lives religion every day
13.
live and let live, to refrain from interfering in others’ lives; to be tolerant
14.
(US, informal) where one lives, in one’s sensitive or defenceless position
/laɪv/
adjective
1.
(prenominal) showing the characteristics of life
2.
(usually prenominal) of, relating to, or abounding in life: the live weight of an animal
3.
(usually prenominal) of current interest; controversial: a live issue
4.
actual: a real live cowboy
5.
(informal) full of life and energy
6.
(of a coal, ember, etc) glowing or burning
7.
(esp of a volcano) not extinct
8.
loaded or capable of exploding: a live bomb
9.
(radio, television) transmitted or present at the time of performance, rather than being a recording: a live show
10.
(of a record)

11.
connected to a source of electric power: a live circuit
12.
(esp of a colour or tone) brilliant or splendid
13.
acoustically reverberant: a live studio
14.
(sport) (of a ball) in play
15.
(of rocks, ores, etc) not quarried or mined; native
16.
being in a state of motion or transmitting power; positively connected to a driving member
17.
(printing)

adverb
18.
during, at, or in the form of a live performance: the show went out live
v.

Old English lifian (Anglian), libban (West Saxon) “to be, to live, have life; to experience,” also “to supply oneself with food, to pass life (in some condition),” from Proto-Germanic *liben (cf. Old Norse lifa “to live, remain,” Old Frisian libba, German leben, Gothic liban “to live”), from PIE root *leip- “to remain, continue” (cf. Greek liparein “to persist, persevere;” see leave). Meaning “to make a residence, dwell” is from c.1200. Related: Lived; living.

According to the Dutch Prouerbe … Leuen ende laetan leuen, To liue and to let others liue. [Malynes, 1622]

To live it up “live gaily and extravagantly” is from 1903. To live up to “act in accordance with” is 1690s, from earlier live up “live on a high (moral or mental) level” (1680s). To live (something) down “outwear (some slander or embarrassment)” is from 1842. To live with “cohabit as husband and wife” is attested from 1749; sense of “to put up with” is attested from 1937. Expression live and learn is attested from c.1620.

adj.

1540s, “having life,” later (1610s) “burning, glowing,” a shortening of alive (q.v.). Sense of “containing unspent energy or power” (live ammunition, etc.) is from 1799. Meaning “in-person” (of performance) is first attested 1934. Live wire is attested from 1890; figurative sense of “active person” is from 1903.

live (līv)
adj.

adjective

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  • Liveable

    [liv-uh-buh l] /ˈlɪv ə bəl/ adjective 1. . [liv-uh-buh l] /ˈlɪv ə bəl/ adjective 1. suitable for in; habitable; comfortable: It took a lot of work to make the old house livable. 2. worth ; endurable: She needed something to make life more livable. 3. that can be with; companionable (often used in combination with […]

  • Live-action

    [lahyv-ak-shuh n] /ˈlaɪvˈæk ʃən/ adjective 1. Informal. 2 (def 11). 2. animated, as distinguished from a single drawing or sketch: Disney perfected the live-action cartoon.



  • Live and learn

    Learn from experience and from your mistakes. Profit from experience, as in I ignored the garden book, planted my beans in March, and they all rotted—live and learn. [ Second half of 1500s ]

  • Live and let live

    We should live the life we choose and allow others to do the same. Show tolerance for those different from yourself. For example, I’m not going to tell my sister what to do—live and let live, I say. [ First half of 1600s ]



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