Logged



[lawg, log] /lɔg, lɒg/

noun
1.
a portion or length of the trunk or of a large limb of a felled tree.
2.
something inert, heavy, or not sentient.
3.
Nautical. any of various devices for determining the speed of a ship, as a or .
4.
any of various records, made in rough or finished form, concerning a trip made by a ship or aircraft and dealing with particulars of navigation, weather, engine performance, discipline, and other pertinent details; .
5.
Movies. an account describing or denoting each shot as it is taken, written down during production and referred to in editing the film.
6.
a register of the operation of a machine.
7.
Also called well log. a record kept during the drilling of a well, especially of the geological formations penetrated.
8.
Computers. any of various chronological records made concerning the use of a computer system, the changes made to data, etc.
9.
Radio and Television. a written account of everything transmitted by a station or network.
10.
Also called log of wood. Australian Slang. a lazy, dull-witted person; fool.
verb (used with object), logged, logging.
11.
to cut (trees) into logs:
to log pine trees for fuel.
12.
to cut down the trees or timber on (land):
We logged the entire area in a week.
13.
to enter in a log; compile; amass; keep a record of:
to log a day’s events.
14.
to make (a certain speed), as a ship or airplane:
We are logging 18 knots.
15.
to travel for (a certain distance or a certain amount of time), according to the record of a log:
We logged 30 miles the first day. He has logged 10,000 hours flying time.
verb (used without object), logged, logging.
16.
to cut down trees and get out logs from the forest for timber:
to log for a living.
Verb phrases
17.
log in,

18.
log off/out, Computers. to terminate a session.
/lɒɡ/
noun
1.

2.

3.
a written record of information about transmissions kept by radio stations, amateur radio operators, etc
4.

5.
(Austral) a claim for better pay and conditions presented by a trade union to an employer
6.
like a log, without stirring or being disturbed (in the phrase sleep like a log)
verb logs, logging, logged
7.
(transitive) to fell the trees of (a forest, area, etc) for timber
8.
(transitive) to saw logs from (trees)
9.
(intransitive) to work at the felling of timber
10.
(transitive) to enter (a distance, event, etc) in a logbook or log
11.
(transitive) to record the punishment received by (a sailor) in a logbook
12.
(transitive) to travel (a specified distance or time) or move at (a specified speed)
/lɒɡ/
noun
1.
short for logarithm
adj.

“reduced to the condition of a log” (which was old sailors’ slang for an incapacitated wooden ship), thus “inert in the water,” c.1820, from log (n.1).
n.

unshaped large piece of tree, early 14c., of unknown origin. Old Norse had lag “felled tree” (from stem of liggja “to lie”), but on phonological grounds many etymologists deny that this is the root of English log. Instead, they suggest an independent formation meant to “express the notion of something massive by a word of appropriate sound.” OED compares clog (n.) in its original Middle English sense “lump of wood.” Log cabin (1770) in American English has been a figure of the honest pioneer since the 1840 presidential campaign of William Henry Harrison. Falling off a log as a type of something easy to do is from 1839.

“record of observations, readings, etc.,” 1842, sailor’s shortening of log-book “daily record of a ship’s speed, progress, etc.” (1670s), from log (n.1) which is so called because a wooden float at the end of a line was cast out to measure a ship’s speed. General sense by 1913.
v.

“to fell a tree,” 1717; earlier “to strip a tree” (1690s), from log (n.1). Related: Logged; logging.

“to enter into a log-book,” 1823, from log (n.2). Meaning “to attain (a speed) as noted in a log” is recorded by 1883. Related: Logged; logging.
log
(lôg)
A logarithm.

Related Terms

beat one’s meat, easy as pie

the smallest measure for liquids used by the Hebrews (Lev. 14:10, 12, 15, 21, 24), called in the Vulgate sextarius. It is the Hebrew unit of measure of capacity, and is equal to the contents of six ordinary hen’s eggs=the twelfth part of a him, or nearly a pint.

In addition to the idiom beginning with
log

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  • Loggerheads

    [law-ger-hed, log-er-] /ˈlɔ gərˌhɛd, ˈlɒg ər-/ noun 1. a thick-headed or stupid person; blockhead. 2. . 3. . 4. a ball or bulb of iron with a long handle, used, after being heated, to melt tar, heat liquids, etc. 5. a rounded post, in the stern of a whaleboat, around which the harpoon line is […]

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