Lop



[lop] /lɒp/

verb (used with object), lopped, lopping.
1.
to cut off (branches, twigs, etc.) from a tree or other plant.
2.
to cut off (a limb, part, or the like) from a person, animal, etc.
3.
to cut off the branches, twigs, etc., of (a tree or other plant).
4.
to eliminate as unnecessary or excessive:
We had to lop off whole pages of the report before presenting it to the committee.
5.
Archaic. to cut off the head, limbs, etc., of (a person).
verb (used without object), lopped, lopping.
6.
to cut off branches, twigs, etc., as of a tree.
7.
to remove parts by or as by cutting.
noun
8.
parts or a part lopped off.
9.
(of trees) the smaller branches and twigs not useful as timber.
[lop] /lɒp/
verb (used without object), lopped, lopping.
1.
to hang loosely or limply; droop.
2.
to sway, move, or go in a drooping or heavy, awkward way.
3.
to move in short, quick leaps:
a rabbit lopping through the garden.
verb (used with object), lopped, lopping.
4.
to let hang or droop:
He lopped his arms at his sides in utter exhaustion.
adjective
5.
hanging down limply or droopingly:
lop ears.
Navigation.
1.
.
/lɒp/
verb lops, lopping, lopped (transitive) usually foll by off
1.
to sever (parts) from a tree, body, etc, esp with swift strokes
2.
to cut out or eliminate from as excessive
noun
3.
a part or parts lopped off, as from a tree
/lɒp/
verb lops, lopping, lopped
1.
to hang or allow to hang loosely
2.
(intransitive) to slouch about or move awkwardly
3.
(intransitive) a less common word for lope
/lɒp/
noun
1.
(Northern English, dialect) a flea
v.

“cut off,” 1510s, from Middle English loppe (n.) “small branches and twigs trimmed from trees” (early 15c.), of unknown origin. Related: Lopped (mid-15c.); lopping. Place name Loppedthorn is attested from 1287.

“droop, hang loosely,” 1570s, probably a variant of lob or of lap (v.); cf. lopsided (1711), originally lapsided, first used of ships. Lop-eared attested from 1680s. Related: Lopped; lopping.

noun

A tedious, contemptible person; dork, jerk, nerd: Lop: a dork

[1980s+ Teenagers; origin unknown]

A language based on first-order logic.
[“SETHEO – A High-Perormance Theorem Prover for First-Order Logic”, Reinhold Letz et al, J Automated Reasoning 8(2):183-212 (1992)].
1.
left occipitoposterior (position)
2.
loss of pointer

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  • Lopatnikov

    [loh-pat-ni-kawf, -kof; Russian luh-paht-nyi-kuh f] /loʊˈpæt nɪˌkɔf, -ˌkɒf; Russian lʌˈpɑt nyɪ kəf/ noun 1. Nicolai Lvovich [nik-uh-lahy luh-voh-vich;; Russian nyi-kuh-lahy lvaw-vyich] /ˈnɪk əˌlaɪ ləˈvoʊ vɪtʃ;; Russian nyɪ kʌˈlaɪ ˈlvɔ vyɪtʃ/ (Show IPA), 1903–76, U.S. composer, born in Russia.

  • Lope

    [lohp] /loʊp/ verb (used without object), loped, loping. 1. to move or run with bounding steps, as a quadruped, or with a long, easy stride, as a person. 2. to canter leisurely with a rather long, easy stride, as a horse. verb (used with object), loped, loping. 3. to cause to lope, as a horse. […]



  • Lop-eared

    [lop-eerd] /ˈlɒpˌɪərd/ adjective 1. having ears that droop or hang down. adjective 1. (of animals) having ears that droop

  • Loped

    [lohp] /loʊp/ verb (used without object), loped, loping. 1. to move or run with bounding steps, as a quadruped, or with a long, easy stride, as a person. 2. to canter leisurely with a rather long, easy stride, as a horse. verb (used with object), loped, loping. 3. to cause to lope, as a horse. […]



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