Lugged



[luhg] /lʌg/

verb (used with object), lugged, lugging.
1.
to pull or carry with force or effort:
to lug a suitcase upstairs.
2.
to introduce or interject in an inappropriate or irrelevant manner:
to lug personalities into a discussion of philosophy.
3.
(of a sailing ship) to carry an excessive amount of (sail) for the conditions prevailing.
verb (used without object), lugged, lugging.
4.
to pull or tug laboriously.
5.
(of an engine or machine) to jerk, hesitate, or strain:
The engine lugs when we climb a steep hill.
noun
6.
an act or instance of lugging; a forcible pull; haul.
7.
a wooden box for transporting fruit or vegetables.
8.
Slang. a request for or exaction of money, as for political purposes:
They put the lug on him at the office.
/lʌɡ/
verb lugs, lugging, lugged
1.
to carry or drag (something heavy) with great effort
2.
(transitive) to introduce (an irrelevant topic) into a conversation or discussion
3.
(transitive) (of a sailing vessel) to carry too much (sail) for the amount of wind blowing
noun
4.
the act or an instance of lugging
/lʌɡ/
noun
1.
a projecting piece by which something is connected, supported, or lifted
2.
Also called tug. a leather loop used in harness for various purposes
3.
a box or basket for vegetables or fruit with a capacity of 28 to 40 pounds
4.
(Scot & Northern English, dialect) another word for ear1
5.
(slang) a man, esp a stupid or awkward one
/lʌɡ/
noun
1.
(nautical) short for lugsail
/lʌɡ/
noun
1.
short for lugworm
v.

late 14c., “to move (something) heavily or slowly,” from Scandinavian (cf. Swedish lugga, Norwegian lugge “to pull by the hair”); see lug (n.). Related: Lugged; lugging.
n.

1620s, “handle of a pitcher,” from lugge (Scottish) “earflap of a cap, ear” (late 15c.; according to OED, the common word for “ear” in 19c. Scotland), probably from Scandinavian (cf. Swedish lugg “forelock,” Norwegian lugg “tuft of hair”). The connecting notion is “something that can be gripped and pulled.” Applied 19c. to mechanical objects that can be grabbed or gripped. Meaning “stupid fellow” is from 1924; that of “lout, sponger” is 1931, American English. Cf. lug-nut (1869), nut closed at one end as a cap.

noun

verb

To solicit money; borrow

[origins and derivations uncertain; the first noun sense is probably fr lug, ”something heavy and clumsy,” attested in the 16th century and retained in several English dialects where it is used derogatorily of persons]

noun

: At colleges as diverse as Smith and Ohio State, for example, episodic lesbians are numerous and open enough to have spawned an acronym: lug, short for Lesbian Until Graduation (1990s+)

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    noun 1. (Brit) a railway carriage used to transport passengers’ luggage, bicycles, etc US and Canadian name baggage car

  • Lugger

    [luhg-er] /ˈlʌg ər/ noun, Nautical. 1. a small ship lug-rigged on two or three masts. /ˈlʌɡə/ noun 1. (nautical) a small working boat rigged with a lugsail n. “small fishing or coasting boat,” 1757, from lugsail (see lug (n.)) or else from Dutch logger “to fish with a dragnet.”



  • Lugger-topsail

    noun, Nautical. 1. a fore-and-aft topsail used above a lugsail.

  • Lugging

    [luhg] /lʌg/ verb (used with object), lugged, lugging. 1. to pull or carry with force or effort: to lug a suitcase upstairs. 2. to introduce or interject in an inappropriate or irrelevant manner: to lug personalities into a discussion of philosophy. 3. (of a sailing ship) to carry an excessive amount of (sail) for the […]



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