Lustre



[luhs-ter] /ˈlʌs tər/

noun, verb (used with or without object), lustred, lustring. Chiefly British.
1.
1 .
[luhs-ter] /ˈlʌs tər/
noun
1.
the state or quality of shining by reflecting light; glitter, sparkle, sheen, or gloss:
the luster of satin.
2.
a substance, as a coating or polish, used to impart sheen or gloss.
3.
radiant or luminous brightness; brilliance; radiance.
4.
radiance of beauty, excellence, merit, distinction, or glory:
achievements that add luster to one’s name.
5.
a shining object, especially one used for decoration, as a cut-glass pendant or ornament.
6.
a chandelier, candleholder, etc., ornamented with cut-glass pendants.
7.
any natural or synthetic fabric with a finish.
8.
Also called metallic luster. an iridescent metallic film produced on the surface of a ceramic glaze.
9.
Mineralogy. the nature of a mineral surface with respect to its reflective qualities:
greasy luster.
verb (used with object)
10.
to finish (fur, cloth, pottery, etc.) with a luster or gloss.
verb (used without object)
11.
to be or become .
[luhs-ter] /ˈlʌs tər/
noun
1.
(def 1).
/ˈlʌstə/
noun
1.
reflected light; sheen; gloss
2.
radiance or brilliance of light
3.
great splendour of accomplishment, beauty, etc
4.
a substance used to polish or put a gloss on a surface
5.
a vase or chandelier from which hang cut-glass drops
6.
a drop-shaped piece of cut glass or crystal used as a decoration on a chandelier, vase, etc
7.

8.
(mineralogy) the way in which light is reflected from the surface of a mineral. It is one of the properties by which minerals are defined
verb
9.
to make, be, or become lustrous
n.

“gloss, radiance;” see luster (n.1).
n.

“gloss, radiance,” 1520s, from Middle French lustre “gloss, radiance” (14c.), common Romanic (cf. Spanish and Portuguese lustre, Rumanian lustru, Italian lustro “splendor, brilliancy”), from Latin lustrare “spread light over, brighten, illumine,” related to lucere “shine,” lux “light” (see light (n.)).

“one who lusts,” 1590s, agent noun from lust (v.).
luster
(lŭs’tər)
The shine from the surface of a mineral. Luster is important in describing different kinds of minerals. It is usually characterized as metallic, glassy, pearly, or dull.

(A French acronym for Synchronous real-time Lucid). Real-time dataflow language for synchronous systems, especially automatic control and signal processing. A Lucid subset, plus timing operators and user-defined clocks.
Designed for automatic control applications. It is based on the idea that automatic control engineers use to analyse, and specify their systems in terms of functions over sequences (sampled signals). It thus seems both safe and cost effective to try to compile directly those descriptions into executable code. A lot of work has been done, so as to get efficient compilation, and also in formal verification. The language has been used in nuclear plant control, and will be used in aircraft control.
[“Outline of a Real-Time Data-Flow Language”, J.-L. Bergerand et al, Proc IEE-CS Real Time Systems Symp, San Diego, IEEE Dec 1985, pp. 33-42].
[“LUSTRE: A Declarative Language for Programming Synchronous Systems”, P. Caspi et al, Conf Rec 14th Ann ACM Symp on Princ Prog Langs, 1987].
(1994-10-12)

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    /ˈlʌstəˌwɛə/ noun 1. pottery or porcelain ware with lustre decoration

  • Lustring

    [luhs-ter] /ˈlʌs tər/ noun, verb (used with or without object), lustred, lustring. Chiefly British. 1. 1 . [luhs-ter] /ˈlʌs tər/ noun 1. the state or quality of shining by reflecting light; glitter, sparkle, sheen, or gloss: the luster of satin. 2. a substance, as a coating or polish, used to impart sheen or gloss. 3. […]



  • Lustrous

    [luhs-truh s] /ˈlʌs trəs/ adjective 1. having ; shining; luminous: lustrous eyes. 2. brilliant; splendid; resplendent; illustrious: a lustrous career. c.1600, from luster + -ous. Related: Lustrously; lustrousness.

  • Lustrum

    [luhs-truh m] /ˈlʌs trəm/ noun, plural lustrums, lustra [luhs-truh] /ˈlʌs trə/ (Show IPA) 1. Also, luster; especially British, lustre. a period of five years. 2. Roman History. a lustration or ceremonial purification of the people, performed every five years, after the taking of the census. /ˈlʌstrəm/ noun (pl) -trums, -tra (-trə) 1. a period of […]



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