Make up for lost time



verb phrase

To work, play, travel, etc, very fast to compensate for a slow start (1774+)
Also, make up ground. Hurry to compensate for wasted time, as in They married late but hoped to make up for lost time, or We’re behind in the schedule, and we’ll just have to make up ground as best we can. The first term was first recorded in 1774; the variant dates from the late 1800s.

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