Manoeuvre



[muh-noo-ver] /məˈnu vər/

noun, verb (used with or without object), manoeuvred, manoeuvring.
1.
Chiefly British. .
[muh-noo-ver] /məˈnu vər/
noun
1.
a planned and regulated movement or evolution of troops, warships, etc.
2.
maneuvers, a series of tactical exercises usually carried out in the field by large bodies of troops in simulating the conditions of war.
3.
an act or instance of changing the direction of a moving ship, vehicle, etc., as required.
4.
an adroit move, skillful proceeding, etc., especially as characterized by craftiness; ploy:
political maneuvers.
verb (used with object), maneuvered, maneuvering.
5.
to change the position of (troops, ships, etc.) by a maneuver.
6.
to bring, put, drive, or make by maneuvers:
He maneuvered his way into the confidence of the enemy.
7.
to manipulate or manage with skill or adroitness:
to maneuver a conversation.
8.
to steer in various directions as required.
verb (used without object), maneuvered, maneuvering.
9.
to perform a maneuver or maneuvers.
10.
to scheme; intrigue.
/məˈnuːvə/
noun
1.
a contrived, complicated, and possibly deceptive plan or action: political manoeuvres
2.
a movement or action requiring dexterity and skill
3.

4.
a planned movement of an aircraft in flight
5.
any change from the straight steady course of a ship
verb
6.
(transitive) to contrive or accomplish with skill or cunning
7.
(intransitive) to manipulate situations, etc, in order to gain some end: to manoeuvre for the leadership
8.
(intransitive) to perform a manoeuvre or manoeuvres
9.
to move or deploy or be moved or deployed, as military units, etc
/məˈnuːvə/
noun, verb
1.
the usual US spelling of manoeuvre

also manoeuver, alternative spelling of maneuver. Also see oe; -re. Related: manoeuvres; manoeuvred; manoeuvring.
n.

“planned movement of troops or warship,” 1758, from French manoeuvre “manipulation, maneuver,” from Old French manovre “manual labor” 13c.), from Medieval Latin manuopera (source of Spanish maniobra, Italian manovra), from manuoperare “work with the hands,” from Latin manu operari, from manu, ablative of manus “hand” (see manual (adj.)) + operari “to work, operate” (see operation). The same word had been borrowed from French into Middle English in a sense “hand-labor” (late 15c.). General meaning “artful plan, adroit movement” is from 1774. Related: Maneuvers.
v.

1777, from maneuver (n.), or else from French manœurvrer “work, work with one’s hands; carry out, prepare” (12c.), from Medieval Latin manuoperare. Originally in a military sense. Figurative use from 1801. Related: Maneuvered; maneuvering.

maneuver ma·neu·ver (mə-nōō’vər, -nyōō’-)
n.
A movement or procedure involving skill and dexterity. v. ma·neu·vered, ma·neu·ver·ing, ma·neu·vers
To manipulate into a desired position or toward a predetermined goal.

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