Mantle



[man-tl] /ˈmæn tl/

noun
1.
a loose, sleeveless cloak or cape.
2.
something that covers, envelops, or conceals:
the mantle of darkness.
3.
Geology. the portion of the earth, about 1800 miles (2900 km) thick, between the crust and the core.
Compare 1 (def 10), (def 6).
4.
Zoology. a single or paired outgrowth of the body wall that lines the inner surface of the valves of the shell in mollusks and brachiopods.
5.
a chemically prepared, incombustible network hood for a gas jet, kerosene wick, etc., that, when the jet or wick is lighted, becomes incandescent and gives off a brilliant light.
6.
Ornithology. the back, scapular, and inner wing plumage, especially when of the same color and distinct from other plumage.
7.
.
8.
Metallurgy. a continuous beam set on a ring of columns and supporting the upper brickwork of a blast furnace in such a way that the brickwork of the hearth and bosh may be readily replaced.
verb (used with object), mantled, mantling.
9.
to cover with or as if with a mantle; envelop; conceal.
verb (used without object), mantled, mantling.
10.
to spread or cover a surface, as a blush over the face.
11.
to flush; blush.
12.
(of a hawk) to spread out one wing and then the other over the corresponding outstretched leg.
13.
to be or become covered with a coating, as a liquid; foam:
The champagne mantled in the glass.
[man-tl] /ˈmæn tl/
noun
1.
Mickey (Charles) 1931–95, U.S. baseball player.
2.
(Robert) Burns, 1873–1948, U.S. journalist.
[man-tl] /ˈmæn tl/
noun
1.
a construction framing the opening of a fireplace and usually covering part of the chimney breast in a more or less decorative manner.
2.
Also called mantelshelf. a shelf above a fireplace opening.
/ˈmæntəl/
noun
1.
(archaic) a loose wrap or cloak
2.
such a garment regarded as a symbol of someone’s power or authority: he assumed his father’s mantle
3.
anything that covers completely or envelops: a mantle of snow
4.
a small dome-shaped or cylindrical mesh impregnated with cerium or thorium nitrates, used to increase illumination in a gas or oil lamp
5.
(zoology) Also called pallium

6.
(ornithol) the feathers of the folded wings and back, esp when these are of a different colour from the remaining feathers
7.
(geology) the part of the earth between the crust and the core, accounting for more than 82% of the earth’s volume (but only 68% of its mass) and thought to be composed largely of peridotite See also asthenosphere
8.
a less common spelling of mantel
9.
(anatomy) another word for pallium (sense 3)
10.
a clay mould formed around a wax model which is subsequently melted out
verb
11.
(transitive) to envelop or supply with a mantle
12.
to spread over or become spread over: the trees were mantled with snow
13.
(transitive) (of the face, cheeks) to become suffused with blood; flush
14.
(intransitive) (falconry) (of a hawk or falcon) to spread the wings and tail over food
/ˈmæntəl/
noun
1.
a wooden or stone frame around the opening of a fireplace, together with its decorative facing
2.
Also called mantel shelf. a shelf above this frame
n.

Old English mentel “loose, sleeveless cloak,” from Latin mantellum “cloak” (source of Italian mantello, Old High German mantal, German Mantel, Old Norse mötull), perhaps from a Celtic source. Reinforced and altered 12c. by cognate Old French mantel “cloak, mantle; bedspread, cover” (Modern French manteau), also from the Latin source. Figurative sense “that which enshrouds” is from c.1300. Allusive use for “symbol of literary authority or artistic pre-eminence” is from Elijah’s mantle [2 Kings ii:13]. As a layer of the earth between the crust and core (though not originally distinguished from the core) it is attested from 1940.
v.

“to wrap in a mantle,” early 13c.; figurative use from mid-15c., from mantle (n.) or from Old French manteler. Related: Mantled; mantling.
n.

c.1200, “short, loose, sleeveless cloak,” variant of mantle (q.v.). Sense of “movable shelter for soldiers besieging a fort” is from 1520s. Meaning “timber or stone supporting masonry above a fireplace” first recorded 1510s, a shortened form of Middle English mantiltre “mantletree” (late 15c.).

mantle man·tle (mān’tl)
n.

mantle
(mān’tl)

The region of the interior of the Earth between the core (on its inner surface) and the crust (on its outer).

Note: The mantle is more than two thousand miles thick and accounts for more than three-quarters of the volume of the Earth.

(1.) Heb. ‘addereth, a large over-garment. This word is used of Elijah’s mantle (1 Kings 19:13, 19; 2 Kings 2:8, 13, etc.), which was probably a sheepskin. It appears to have been his only garment, a strip of skin or leather binding it to his loins. _’Addereth_ twice occurs with the epithet “hairy” (Gen. 25:25; Zech. 13:4, R.V.). It is the word denoting the “goodly Babylonish garment” which Achan coveted (Josh. 7:21). (2.) Heb. me’il, frequently applied to the “robe of the ephod” (Ex. 28:4, 31; Lev. 8:7), which was a splendid under tunic wholly of blue, reaching to below the knees. It was woven without seam, and was put on by being drawn over the head. It was worn not only by priests but by kings (1 Sam. 24:4), prophets (15:27), and rich men (Job 1:20; 2:12). This was the “little coat” which Samuel’s mother brought to him from year to year to Shiloh (1 Sam. 2:19), a miniature of the official priestly robe. (3.) Semikah, “a rug,” the garment which Jael threw as a covering over Sisera (Judg. 4:18). The Hebrew word occurs nowhere else in Scripture. (4.) Maataphoth, plural, only in Isa. 3:22, denoting a large exterior tunic worn by females. (See DRESS.)

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Mantlepiece

    [man-tl-pees] /ˈmæn tlˌpis/ noun 1. .

  • Mantle-plume

    noun, Geology. 1. (def 10). noun (geology) 1. another name for plume (sense 6)



  • Mantle radiotherapy

    mantle radiotherapy n. The use of radiotherapy with protection of uninvolved radiosensitive structures or organs.

  • Mantle-rock

    noun, Physical Geography. 1. the layer of disintegrated and decomposed rock fragments, including soil, just above the solid rock of the earth’s crust; regolith.



Disclaimer: Mantle definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.