[merd; English maird] /mɛrd; English mɛərd/ French.

(used as an expletive to express anger, annoyance, disgust, etc.)

crap!, shit!; an expression of annoyance, disgust, or exasperation
Word Origin

Usage Note


also merd, “dung,” late 15c., from French merde “feces, excrement, dirt” (13c.), from Latin merda “dung, ordure, excrement,” of unknown origin. Naturalized in English through 17c., but subsequently lost and since mid-19c. (and especially since World War I) generally treated as a French word when used in English.


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