Messaging



[mes-uh-jing] /ˈmɛs ə dʒɪŋ/

noun
1.
a system or process of transmitting , especially electronically, by computer, telephone, television cable, etc.
[mes-ij] /ˈmɛs ɪdʒ/
noun
1.
a communication containing some information, news, advice, request, or the like, sent by messenger, telephone, email, or other means.
2.
an official communication, as from a chief executive to a legislative body:
the president’s message to Congress.
3.
Digital Technology. a post or reply on an online message board.
4.
the inspired utterance of a prophet or sage.
5.
the point, moral, or meaning of a gesture, utterance, novel, motion picture, etc.
6.
Computers. a warning, permission, etc., communicated by the system or software to the user:
an error message; a message to allow blocked content.
verb (used without object)
7.
to send a message, especially an electronic message.
verb (used with object)
8.
to send (a person) a message.
9.
to send as a message.
Idioms
10.
get the message, Informal. to understand or comprehend, especially to infer the correct meaning from circumstances, hints, etc.:
If we don’t invite him to the party, maybe he’ll get the message.
/ˈmɛsɪdʒɪŋ/
noun
1.
the practice of sending and receiving written communications by computer or mobile phone
/ˈmɛsɪdʒ/
noun
1.
a communication, usually brief, from one person or group to another
2.
an implicit meaning or moral, as in a work of art
3.
a formal communiqué
4.
an inspired communication of a prophet or religious leader
5.
a mission; errand
6.
(pl) (Scot) shopping: going for the messages
7.
(informal) get the message, to understand what is meant
verb
8.
(transitive) to send as a message, esp to signal (a plan, etc)
n.

1865, verbal noun from message (v.).
n.

c.1300, “communication transmitted via a messenger,” from Old French message “message, news, tidings, embassy” (11c.), from Medieval Latin missaticum, from Latin missus “a sending away, sending, despatching; a throwing, hurling,” noun use of past participle of mittere “to send” (see mission). The Latin word is glossed in Old English by ærende. Specific religious sense of “divinely inspired communication via a prophet” (1540s) led to transferred sense of “the broad meaning (of something),” first attested 1828. To get the message “understand” is from 1960.
v.

“to send messages,” 1580s, from message (n.). Related: Messaged; messaging.

verb

To send a message on the Internet •The sense ”to send a message” is found by 1583: ” I need to do it,” Baker messaged a man with whom he had been discussing rape, torture, and murder (1990s+ Computer)
see: get the message

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    [mes-uh-leen, mes-uh-leen] /ˌmɛs əˈlin, ˈmɛs əˌlin/ noun 1. a thin, soft silk with a twill or satin weave. /ˌmɛsəˈliːn; ˈmɛsəˌliːn/ noun 1. a light lustrous twilled-silk fabric



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