Misaim



[eym] /eɪm/

verb (used with object)
1.
to position or direct (a firearm, ball, arrow, rocket, etc.) so that, on firing or release, the discharged projectile will hit a target or travel along a certain path.
2.
to intend or direct for a particular effect or purpose:
to aim a satire at snobbery.
verb (used without object)
3.
to point or direct a gun, punch, etc., toward:
He aimed at the target but missed it.
4.
to strive; try (usually followed by to or at):
We aim to please. They aim at saving something every month.
5.
to intend:
She aims to go tomorrow.
6.
to direct efforts, as toward an object:
The satire aimed at modern greed.
7.
Obsolete. to estimate; guess.
noun
8.
the act of aiming or directing anything at or toward a particular point or target.
9.
the direction in which a weapon or missile is pointed; the line of sighting:
within the cannon’s aim.
10.
the point intended to be hit; thing or person aimed at:
to miss one’s aim.
11.
something intended or desired to be attained by one’s efforts; purpose:
whatever his aim in life may be.
12.
Obsolete. conjecture; guess.
Idioms
13.
take aim, to sight a target:
to take aim and fire.
/eɪm/
verb
1.
to point (a weapon, missile, etc) or direct (a blow) at a particular person or object; level
2.
(transitive) to direct (satire, criticism, etc) at a person, object, etc
3.
(intransitive; foll by at or an infinitive) to propose or intend: we aim to leave early
4.
(intransitive; often foll by at or for) to direct one’s efforts or strive (towards): to aim at better communications, to aim high
noun
5.
the action of directing something at an object
6.
the direction in which something is pointed; line of sighting (esp in the phrase to take aim)
7.
the object at which something is aimed; target
8.
intention; purpose
abbreviation
1.
(in Britain) Alternative Investment Market
v.

early 14c., “to estimate, calculate,” also “to intend,” from Old French aesmer “value, rate; count, estimate,” from Latin aestimare “appraise” (see estimation); current meaning apparently developed from “esteem,” to “calculate,” to “calculate with a view to action” (c.1400), then to “direct a missile, a blow, etc.” (1570s). Related: Aimed; aiming.
n.

early 14c., “target;” late 14c., “guess;” from aim (v.). Meaning “action of aiming” is from early 15c. (to take aim, originally make aim); that of “thing intended, purpose” is from 1620s.
American Indian Movement
In addition to the idiom beginning with aim

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