Mitred



[mahy-ter] /ˈmaɪ tər/

noun, verb (used with object), mitred, mitring. Chiefly British.
1.
.
[mahy-ter] /ˈmaɪ tər/
noun
1.
the official headdress of a bishop in the Western Church, in its modern form a tall cap with a top deeply cleft crosswise, the outline of the front and back resembling that of a pointed arch.
2.
the office or rank of a bishop; bishopric.
3.
Judaism. the official headdress of the ancient high priest, bearing on the front a gold plate engraved with the words Holiness to the Lord. Ex. 28:36–38.
4.
a fillet worn by women of ancient Greece.
5.
Carpentry. an oblique surface formed on a piece of wood or the like so as to butt against an oblique surface on another piece to be joined with it.
6.
Nautical. the inclined seam connecting the two cloths of an angulated sail.
verb (used with object)
7.
to bestow a miter upon, or raise to a rank entitled to it.
8.
to join with a .
9.
to cut to a miter.
10.
to join (two edges of fabric) at a corner by various methods of folding, cutting, and stitching.
/ˈmaɪtə/
noun, verb
1.
the usual US spelling of mitre
/ˈmaɪtə/
noun
1.
(Christianity) the liturgical headdress of a bishop or abbot, in most western churches consisting of a tall pointed cleft cap with two bands hanging down at the back
2.
short for mitre joint
3.
a bevelled surface of a mitre joint
4.
(in sewing) a diagonal join where the hems along two sides meet at a corner of the fabric
verb (transitive)
5.
to make a mitre joint between (two pieces of material, esp wood)
6.
to make a mitre in (a fabric)
7.
to confer a mitre upon: a mitred abbot
n.

bishop’s tall hat, late 14c., from Old French mitre, from Latin mitra “headband, turban,” from Greek mitra “headband, turban,” earlier a belt or cloth worn under armor about the waist, from PIE root *mei- “to tie” (cf. Sanskrit Mitrah, Old Persian Mithra-, god names; Russian mir “world, peace,” Greek mitos “a warp thread”). In Latin, “a kind of headdress common among Asiatics, the wearing of which by men was regarded in Rome as a mark of effeminacy” [OED]. But the word was used in Vulgate to translate Hebrew micnepheth “headdress of a priest.”
n.

alternative spelling of mitre (see -re).

in the carpentry sense of “joint at a 45 degree angle,” 1670s, perhaps from mitre, via notion of joining of the two peaks of the folded cap. As a verb from 1731.

(Heb. mitsnepheth), something rolled round the head; the turban or head-dress of the high priest (Ex. 28:4, 37, 39; 29:6, etc.). In the Authorized Version of Ezek. 21:26, this Hebrew word is rendered “diadem,” but in the Revised Version, “mitre.” It was a twisted band of fine linen, 8 yards in length, coiled into the form of a cap, and worn on official occasions (Lev. 8:9; 16:4; Zech. 3:5). On the front of it was a golden plate with the inscription, “Holiness to the Lord.” The mitsnepheth differed from the mitre or head-dress (migba’ah) of the common priest. (See BONNET.)

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    noun 1. a corner joint formed between two pieces of material, esp wood, by cutting bevels of equal angles at the ends of each piece Sometimes shortened to mitre



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  • Mitrewort

    [mahy-ter-wurt, -wawrt] /ˈmaɪ tərˌwɜrt, -ˌwɔrt/ noun, Chiefly British. 1. . [mahy-ter-wurt, -wawrt] /ˈmaɪ tərˌwɜrt, -ˌwɔrt/ noun 1. any of several plants belonging to the genus Mitella, of the saxifrage family, having a capsule that resembles a bishop’s . /ˈmaɪtəˌwɜːt/ noun 1. any of several Asian and North American saxifragaceous plants of the genus Mitella, having […]



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