Mode



[mohd] /moʊd/

noun
1.
a manner of acting or doing; method; way:
modern modes of transportation.
2.
a particular type or form of something:
Heat is a mode of motion.
3.
a designated condition or status, as for performing a task or responding to a problem:
a machine in the automatic mode.
4.
Philosophy.

5.
Logic.

6.
Music. any of various arrangements of the diatonic tones of an octave, differing from one another in the order of the whole steps and half steps; scale.
7.
Grammar. 2 (def 1).
8.
Statistics. the value of the variate at which a relative or absolute maximum occurs in the frequency distribution of the variate.
9.
Petrography. the actual mineral composition of a rock, expressed in percentages by weight.
10.
Physics. any of the distinct patterns of oscillation that a given periodically varying system can have.
[mohd] /moʊd/
noun
1.
fashion or style in manners, dress, etc.:
He was much concerned to keep up with the latest mode.
2.
a light gray or drab color.
/məʊd/
noun
1.
a manner or way of doing, acting, or existing
2.
the current fashion or style
3.
(music)

4.
(logic, linguistics) another name for modality (sense 3), mood2 (sense 2)
5.
(philosophy) a complex combination of ideas the realization of which is not determined by the component ideas
6.
that one of a range of values that has the highest frequency as determined statistically Compare mean3 (sense 4), median (sense 6)
7.
the quantitative mineral composition of an igneous rock
8.
(physics) one of the possible configurations of a travelling or stationary wave
9.
(physics) one of the fundamental vibrations
n.

“manner,” late 14c., “kind of musical scale,” from Latin modus “measure, extent, quantity; proper measure, rhythm, song; a way, manner, fashion, style” (in Late Latin also “mood” in grammar and logic), from PIE root *med- “to measure, limit, consider, advise, take appropriate measures” (see medical). Meaning “manner in which a thing is done” first recorded 1660s.

“current fashion,” 1640s, from French mode “manner, fashion, style” (15c.), from Latin modus “manner” (see mode (n.1)).

mode (mōd)
n.

mode
(mōd)
The value that occurs most frequently in a data set. For example, in the set 125, 140, 172, 164, 140, 110, the mode is 140. Compare arithmetic mean, average, median.

In statistics, the most frequently appearing value in a set of numbers or data points. In the numbers 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 4, 9, 6, 8, and 6, the mode is 6, because it appears more often than any of the other figures. (See average; compare mean and median.)

An object-oriented language.
[“The Programming Language Mode: Language Definition and User Guide”, J. Vihavainen, C-1987-50, U Helsinki, 1987].
[Jargon File]
(1994-10-21)

1. A general state, usually used with an adjective describing the state. Use of the word “mode” rather than “state” implies that the state is extended over time, and probably also that some activity characteristic of that state is being carried out. “No time to hack; I’m in thesis mode.”
In its jargon sense, “mode” is most often attributed to people, though it is sometimes applied to programs and inanimate objects. In particular, see hack mode, day mode, night mode, demo mode, fireworks mode, and yoyo mode; also chat.
2. More technically, a mode is a special state that certain user interfaces must pass into in order to perform certain functions. For example, in order to insert characters into a document in the Unix editor “vi”, one must type the “i” key, which invokes the “Insert” command. The effect of this command is to put vi into “insert mode”, in which typing the “i” key has a quite different effect (to wit, it inserts an “i” into the document). One must then hit another special key, “ESC”, in order to leave “insert mode”. Nowadays, modeful interfaces are generally considered losing but survive in quite a few widely used tools built in less enlightened times.
[Jargon File]
(1994-12-22)

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Mode bit

    A flag, usually in hardware, that selects between two (usually quite different) modes of operation. The connotations are different from flag bit in that mode bits are mainly written during a boot or set-up phase, are seldom explicitly read, and seldom change over the lifetime of an ordinary program. The classic example was the EBCDIC-vs.-ASCII […]

  • Modef

    Pascal-like language with polymorphism and data abstraction. “Definition of the Programming Language MODEF”, J. Steensgard-Madsen et al, SIGPLAN Notices 19(2):92-110 (Feb 1984).



  • Model

    [mod-l] /ˈmɒd l/ noun 1. a standard or example for imitation or comparison. 2. a representation, generally in miniature, to show the construction or appearance of something. 3. an image in clay, wax, or the like, to be reproduced in more durable material. 4. a person or thing that serves as a subject for an […]

  • Model checking

    theory, algorithm, testing To algorithmically check whether a program (the model) satisfies a specification. The model is usually expressed as a directed graph consisting of nodes (or vertices) and edges. A set of atomic propositions is associated with each node. The nodes represents states of a program, the edges represent possible executions which alters the […]



Disclaimer: Mode definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.