Mood



[mood] /mud/

noun
1.
a state or quality of feeling at a particular time:
What’s the boss’ mood today?
2.
a distinctive emotional quality or character:
The mood of the music was almost funereal.
3.
a prevailing emotional tone or general attitude:
the country’s mood.
4.
a frame of mind disposed or receptive, as to some activity or thing:
I’m not in the mood to see a movie.
5.
a state of sullenness, gloom, or bad temper.
[mood] /mud/
noun
1.
Grammar.

2.
Logic. a classification of categorical syllogisms by the use of three letters that name, respectively, the major premise, the minor premise, and the conclusion.
/muːd/
noun
1.
a temporary state of mind or temper: a cheerful mood
2.
a sullen or gloomy state of mind, esp when temporary: she’s in a mood
3.
a prevailing atmosphere or feeling
4.
in the mood, in a favourable state of mind (for something or to do something)
/muːd/
noun
1.
(grammar) a category of the verb or verbal inflections that expresses semantic and grammatical differences, including such forms as the indicative, subjunctive, and imperative
2.
(logic) one of the possible arrangements of the syllogism, classified solely by whether the component propositions are universal or particular and affirmative or negative Compare figure (sense 18)
n.

“emotional condition, frame of mind,” Old English mod “heart, frame of mind, spirit; courage, arrogance, pride; power, violence,” from Proto-Germanic *motha- (cf. Old Saxon mod “mind, courage,” Old Frisian mod “intellect, mind, intention,” Old Norse moðr “wrath, anger,” Middle Dutch moet, Dutch moed, Old High German muot, German Mut “courage,” Gothic moþs “courage, anger”), of unknown origin.

A much more vigorous word in Anglo-Saxon than currently, and used widely in compounds (e.g. modcræftig “intelligent,” modful “proud”). To be in the mood “willing (to do something)” is from 1580s. First record of mood swings is from 1942.

“grammatical form indicating the function of a verb,” 1560s, an alteration of mode (n.1), but the grammatical and musical (1590s) usages of it influenced the meaning of mood (n.1) in phrases such as light-hearted mood.

mood 1 (mōōd)
n.
A state of mind or emotion.
see:

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